CROATIA / SYRIAN REFUGEE PRINTER

14-Jan-2019 00:02:27
Anass Mousa worked for 15 years as a printer in Syria before war turned him into a refugee. He landed in Croatia, finding a job with the country’s oldest printing house and helping the company face a severe labour shortage. UNHCR
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: CROATIA / SYRIAN REFUGEE PRINTER
TRT:2:27
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /CROATIAN /NATS

DATELINE: 5 DECEMBER 2018, ZAGREB, CROATIA
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, Anass setting up a new machine
2. Close up, Anass connecting electric cables
3. Various shots, Anass talking with colleagues
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Anass Mousa, Syrian refugee printer:
“We don’t need to make a big conversation to understand what I must to do. So, with a few words, I know exactly what they need.”
5. Med shot, Anass working
6. Wide shot, factory
7. Various shots, printers at work
8. Med shot, Zeba talking to Anass
9. SOUNDBITE (Croatian) Domagoj Zeba, Executive Director of Production, Graficki Zavod Hrvatske:
“We were witnesses of what was happening through media. That, therefore, prompted our desire to provide an opportunity for them to work, and to help them.”
10. Wide shot, Zeba with workers
11. Med shot, Anass working
12. SOUNDBITE (Croatian) Domagoj Zeba, Executive Director of Production, Graficki Zavod Hrvatske:
“We have an employee who even came from the same field as ours, so his knowledge was not only useful and helped him to adapt to our workplace, but his ideas and experience have helped us, as well.”
13. Various shots, production
STORYLINE
Anass Mousa worked for 15 years as a printer in Syria before war turned him into a refugee. He landed in Croatia, finding a job with the country’s oldest printing house and helping the company face a severe labour shortage.

SOUNDBITE (English) Anass Mousa, Syrian refugee printer:
“We don’t need to make a big conversation to understand what I must to do. So, with a few words, I know exactly what they need.”

Grafički Zavod Hrvatske (Croatian Graphics Institute), is employing a small group of refugees needing jobs in a win-win arrangement that could be a blueprint for social integration and a partial solution to Croatia’s labour shortage. Domagoj Zeba is their executive director of production at the print works, which among other texts prints books for schools. When the refugee crisis unfolded in 2015, he watched it all on television. He recalled the experience of war in the Balkans in the 1990s and wanted to help.

SOUNDBITE (Croatian) Domagoj Zeba, Executive Director of Production, Graficki Zavod Hrvatske:
“We were witnesses of what was happening through media. That, therefore, prompted our desire to provide an opportunity for them to work, and to help them.”

Zeba’s altruism has aligned with the commercial needs of his company. New EU member Croatia has suffered a drain of its own skilled workforce and has a severe labour shortage. At the Croatian Graphics Institute, Zeba also faced a shortage of skilled job candidates. He had up to five refugees working there, but two have since left, leaving three including Anass. He says he could fill 10 vacancies and is still open to hiring more refugees and wants people interested in long-term positions who can progress in their field.

SOUNDBITE (Croatian) Domagoj Zeba, Executive Director of Production, Graficki Zavod Hrvatske:
“We have an employee who even came from the same field as ours, so his knowledge was not only useful and helped him to adapt to our workplace, but his ideas and experience have helped us, as well.”

The Croatian Employers’ Association advocates speeding up the system whereby asylum seekers must wait nine months before they can start working, arguing that integration can start much earlier.
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed190114b