UN / YEMEN

09-Jan-2019 00:02:52
The Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, told the Security Council that “both sides have largely adhered” to the ceasefire in Hudaydah governorate agreed in Stockholm late last year. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / YEMEN
TRT: 02:52
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 09 JANUARY 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UN flag outside United Nations headquarters

09 JANUARY 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council with Martin Griffiths on screen
3. Med shot, Yemen Ambassador
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen:
“I am pleased to report that both sides have largely adhered to the ceasefire we agreed in Stockholm in Hudaydah governorate that entered into force on the 18th of December, and that there has been a significant decrease in hostilities since then. Unfortunately, and perhaps unsurprisingly, there has been some violence, including in Hudaydah city, and in the southern districts of the governorate. However, this is remarkably limited compared to what we saw in the weeks before the Stockholm consultations.”
5. Wide shot, Council
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen:
“Progress on some of the issues has been gradual and indeed somewhat tentative, but there is a tangible contribution to peace. There are, no doubt, many hurdles to be overcome in the days, weeks and months ahead, but I would say here, that the parties must not be diverted from their commitments through issues of delays and difficulties which are unexpected, and I ask for the support of the Council in encouraging the parties to stay the course and to overcome together any challenges that may be encountered along the way.”
7. Med shot, delegates
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“I cannot yet report to you that the wider humanitarian situation in Yemen is any better. It remains
catastrophic. More than 24 million people now need humanitarian assistance – that’s 80 percent of the population. They include nearly 10 million people just a step away from famine.”
9. Med shot, delegates
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“While the situation on fuel imports improved and more ships sought to reach the ports, commercial food imports in December plummeted to just 163,000 metric tons, which in fact is the lowest figure recorded since UNVIM began monitoring in July 2016. This is deeply concerning in an environment where a serious threat of famine persists.”
11. Med shot, delegates
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdullah Ali Fadhel Al-Saadi, Permanent Representative of Yemen to the United Nations:
“The implementation of the Stockholm Agreement with respect for the withdrawal and redeployment according to the agreed upon timeframe is absolutely crucial. This is clear and this needs to take place before a new round of negotiations is started.”
13. Wide shot, Council
STORYLINE
The Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, today (09 Jan) told the Security Council that “both sides have largely adhered” to the ceasefire in Hudaydah governorate agreed in Stockholm late last year.


Briefing via teleconference from Amman, Jordan, Griffiths said, “there has been a significant decrease in hostilities since then,” but “unfortunately, and perhaps unsurprisingly, there has been some violence, including in Hudaydah city, and in the southern districts of the governorate.”

However, he added “this is remarkably limited compared to what we saw in the weeks before the Stockholm consultations.”

The Special Envoy said, “progress on some of the issues has been gradual and indeed somewhat tentative, but there is a tangible contribution to peace.”

He called on the parties “not be diverted from their commitments through issues of delays and difficulties which are unexpected,” and asked for the support of the Council “in encouraging the parties to stay the course and to overcome together any challenges that may be encountered along the way.”

On the humanitarian front, Emergency Relief Coordinator Mark Lowcock said that despite the agreement, “I cannot yet report to you that the wider humanitarian situation in Yemen is any better. It remains catastrophic.”

He said, “more than 24 million people now need humanitarian assistance – that’s 80 percent of the population. They include nearly 10 million people just a step away from famine.”

Lowcock said “commercial food imports in December plummeted to just 163,000 metric tons, which in fact is the lowest figure recorded since UNVIM began monitoring in July 2016,” and added this is deeply concerning in an environment where a serious threat of famine persists.”

For his part, Yemeni Ambassador, Abdullah Ali Fadhel Al-Saadi, told the Council that “the implementation of the Stockholm Agreement with respect for the withdrawal and redeployment according to the agreed upon timeframe is absolutely crucial.”

He said, “this is clear and this needs to take place before a new round of negotiations is started.”

On 21 December 2018, the Security Council adopted resolution 2451, endorsing the agreements reached during last month’s consultations in Sweden between the Yemeni government and the Houthi rebels. These agreements, which are collectively outlined in what is called the Stockholm Agreement, include an agreement on the city and governorate of Hodeidah and the ports of Hodeidah, Saleef and Ras Isa; an executive mechanism to implement a prisoner exchange agreement that was reached just prior to the talks; and a statement of understanding on the city of Taiz.
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