UNICEF / SYRIA FORE VISIT

13-Dec-2018 00:01:45
At the end of a five-day visit to Syria, UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore said almost eight years since the conflict started, the needs are still great adding that the millions of children born during the war are ready to heal. UNICEF
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STORY: UNICEF / SYRIA FORE VISIT
TRT: 1:45
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNICEF ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 10-12 DECEMBER 2018, EASTERN GHOUTA / DARAA / HAMA, SYRIA
SHOTLIST
10 DECEMBER 2018, EASTERN GHOUTA, SYRIA

1. Med shot, Fore walking down street amid rubble
2. Wide shot, Fore visiting UNICEF-supported water network repair and rehabilitation project in Mafrak Al-Hajariyah neighbourhood of Douma

12 DECEMBER 2018, HAMA, SYRIA

3. Wide shot, Fore walking into UNICEF supported school in Hama city
4. Med shot, Fore speaking to teacher at UNICEF-supported Maardes primary school in northern rural Hama
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Henrietta Fore, Executive Director, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF):
“Thirty years since the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, children living in war zones are among those whose rights are most denied. UNICEF is on the front line, doing what we can to help protect these children. To provide the support and services that they need. To help them recover from the horrors of war. But enough is enough. It’s time to put children first and to fulfil their rights. This is a commitment that almost every single country made 30 years ago, and every single country needs to honour today.”

11 DECEMBER 2018, DARAA, SYRIA

6. Med shot, Fore speaking to student at UNICEF-supported Al Mahatta Al Awla primary school
7. Wide shot, Fore speaking with children in schoolyard
8. Wide shot, Fore being briefed on the work process, at water pumping station in Khirbet Ghazaleh village
9. Med shot, GOPA volunteers upon greeting Fore at UNICEF-supported child friendly space in Dara’a
STORYLINE
At the end of a five-day visit to Syria, UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore said almost eight years since the conflict started, the needs are still great adding that the millions of children born during the war are ready to heal.

UNICEF said with an estimated four million children born in Syria since the conflict started nearly eight years ago, half of the country’s children have grown up only knowing war, adding that reaching them wherever they are remains a priority.

Visiting some of the newly accessible areas in Syria, Fore saw first-hand how the conflict has affected families, children and the communities in which they live.

UNICEF said, just a few months after a five-year siege was lifted, displaced families are beginning to return to Douma in Eastern Ghouta and the town’s population is now estimated at 200,000. Many families have moved back into damaged buildings, and the threat of unexploded ordnance is pervasive. Since May 2018, 26 children have reportedly been killed or injured in all of East Ghouta as a result of explosive remnants of war.

Fore said families in Douma are living amidst the rubble, struggling for water, food and warmth. She said there are 20 schools, and all are overcrowded.

As access has improved, UNICEF said it was scaling up its health, nutrition and child protection support services, helping schools, offering accelerated learning programmes for students who have missed out on years of schooling, training teachers, and repairing sewage networks and water pipelines and treatment plants.

In areas that remain hard to reach, UNICEF renewed its call for regular and unconditional access and continues to work with partners to provide immediate assistance whenever possible.

UNICEF called for the protection of children at all times throughout Syria and for a stronger emphasis on re-stitching the social fabric ripped apart by years of fighting.

UNICEF’s Executive Director said, “Thirty years since the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, children living in war zones are among those whose rights are most denied.” She said it was “time to put children first and to fulfil their rights; this is a commitment that almost every single country made 30 years ago, and every single country needs to honour today.”
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