UN / GENOCIDE PREVENTION

07-Dec-2018 00:02:57
Following a moment of silence for victims of genocide, Secretary-General António Guterres said “seventy years after the Genocide Convention was adopted, people are still being killed, raped, their homes torched, their lands confiscated, just because of who they are.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / GENOCIDE PREVENTION
TRT: 02:57
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 07 DECEMBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
RECENT - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, UN Headquarters

07 DECEMBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
3. Various shots, Secretary-General António Guterres leading a moment of silence
4. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Today, seventy years after the Genocide Convention was adopted, people are still being killed, raped, their homes torched, their lands confiscated, just because of who they are.”
5. Med shot, delegates
6. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“In Iraq, the violent extremists of Daesh brutally targeted the Yazidi people for murder, sexual slavery and trafficking, so courageously described by survivor and Nobel laureate Nadia Murad. I am extremely concerned about the plight of the Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar, who have been systematically killed, tortured, raped and burnt alive, victims of what has rightly been called ethnic cleansing. I will never forget the bone-chilling accounts I heard from Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh earlier this year. Elsewhere around the world, racism, hate speech, violent misogyny, antisemitism, Islamophobia and all forms of xenophobia are on the rise. We now know that dehumanizing language is not only evil in itself. It may also sow the seeds for far more evil acts, including genocide.”
7. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Adama Dieng, UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide:
“The genocides that took place after the adoption of the Convention in Cambodia, Rwanda and Srebrenica could have been prevented. Nowadays, not only do we continue to witness ethnic and religious tensions in various regions of the world but, worryingly, there has been a dangerous increase in the number of situations that merit our urgent attention. The extreme forms of identity-based violence that we have witnessed in countries such as the Central African Republic, Iraq, South Sudan and Syria are unacceptable. But equally intolerable are the serious human rights violations and abuses that different ethnic, religious or national groups are suffering in Myanmar, Nigeria or in the North Caucasus, to name just a few.”
9. Med shot, delegates
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Adama Dieng, UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide:
“Europe is facing a wave of populism that is slowly eroding the enjoyment of rights and promoting the rise of racism, xenophobia, hate speech and hate crimes. Here in the United States, migrants and refugees are being vilified. All this should raise alarms. However, the level of complacency is still strong.”
13. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
Following a moment of silence for victims of genocide, Secretary-General António Guterres today (7 Dec) said “seventy years after the Genocide Convention was adopted, people are still being killed, raped, their homes torched, their lands confiscated, just because of who they are.”

Addressing a special event commemorating the anniversary of the Convention, the Secretary General cited “the violent extremists of Daesh” in Iraq, who “brutally targeted the Yazidi people for murder, sexual slavery and trafficking” as well as Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar, who have been systematically killed, tortured, raped and burnt alive, victims of what has rightly been called ethnic cleansing” as examples.
Elsewhere around the world, he said “racism, hate speech, violent misogyny, antisemitism, Islamophobia and all forms of xenophobia are on the rise” and added that “dehumanizing language is not only evil in itself. It may also sow the seeds for far more evil acts, including genocide.”

Also addressing the meeting, the UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, Adama Dieng, said “the genocides that took place after the adoption of the Convention in Cambodia, Rwanda and Srebrenica could have been prevented.”

Nowadays, he noted, “not only do we continue to witness ethnic and religious tensions in various regions of the world but, worryingly, there has been a dangerous increase in the number of situations that merit our urgent attention.”

Deng said, “the extreme forms of identity-based violence that we have witnessed in countries such as the Central African Republic, Iraq, South Sudan and Syria are unacceptable.”

Equally intolerable, he added, “are the serious human rights violations and abuses that different ethnic, religious or national groups are suffering in Myanmar, Nigeria or in the North Caucasus, to name just a few.”

In the developed world, the Special Adviser said, “Europe is facing a wave of populism that is slowly eroding the enjoyment of rights and promoting the rise of racism, xenophobia, hate speech and hate crimes,” while in the United States, “migrants and refugees are being vilified.”

He said, “all this should raise alarms. However, the level of complacency is still strong.”

The adoption of the Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide was the first human rights treaty to be adopted by the General Assembly and signified the international community’s ‘never again’ commitment, after the atrocities committed during the Second World War.
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