NEPAL / MIGRANTS

06-Dec-2018 00:03:13
Thousands of young women from Nepal leave their country to work abroad not having the basic skills needed for their new jobs overseas and may be at risk for abuse and exploitation. The ILO-DFID "Work in Freedom" program offers vocational and skills training, helping them to make a more informed choice about working abroad. ILO
Size
Format
Acquire
461.53 MB
HD PAL
223.87 MB
SD PAL
461.6 MB
HD NTSC
DESCRIPTION
STORY: NEPAL / MIGRANTS
TRT: 03:13
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: NEPALI / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: DECEMBER 2016, NEPAL
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, Sharmila Rai Gurung feeding chicken
2. Various shots, Gurung outside coop
3. SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sharmila Rai Gurung, Farmer and Former Migrant Worker:
“Before, the situation at home was not good. My younger sisters and brothers were very young, there were nine of us.”
4. Various shots, Gurung feeding goats
5. Various shots, Gurung washing cooking utensils
6. Med shot, Gurung walking through doorway
7. SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sharmila Rai Gurung, Farmer and Former Migrant Worker:
“I worked in two different places. At first, it was difficult. I had to do the work of three, four people. When I had extra time, they even made me clean the snow on the roof.”
8. Various shots, city views
9. Various shots, classroom
10. Various shots, women in vocational training workshops
11. Various shots, social mobilizer visiting family
12. Various shots, Social Mobilizer Sangita Pokharel at work
13. SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sangita Pokharel, Social Mobilizer:
“We orient women in the empowerment process. We give them information and help them to get in touch with other agencies and government offices.”
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Bharati Sharma Pokharel, National Project Coordinator, CO-Kathmandu:
“They are able now to make socio-economic analysis and based on it they have been making form choice of decision on migration. They are many who have analysed and based on it, they have decided to stay back in Nepal looking after other employment, receiving other vocational trainings.”
15. Various shots, Gurung feeding chicken
16. Various shots, Gurung and family looking at photographs

STORYLNE:

Every year, thousands of young women from Nepal leave their country to work abroad. But many who make the decision don't have the basic skills needed for their new jobs overseas. And very few know how they may be at risk for abuse and exploitation. The ILO-DFID "Work in Freedom" program offers vocational and skills training for Nepalese women, helping them to make a more informed choice about working abroad.

Sharmila Rai Gurung grows vegetables and breeds poultry on a small plot of land next to the house she shares with her mother in law and younger brothers. The house was badly damaged by the 2015 earthquake that devastated parts of Nepal.

But Sharmila's life was once very different. She spent 7 years abroad as a migrant worker. She felt she had no choice.

SOUNDBITE (Nepal) Sharmila Rai Gurung, Farmer and Former Migrant Worker:
“Before, the situation at home was not good. My younger sisters and brothers were very young, there were nine of us.”

Some friends spoke to me they said that if we went to a foreign country, we would be able to make money.

Sharmila was just 16 at the time. Using a passport giving her age as 26, she travelled via India to Saudi Arabia where she did domestic work for 2 years, then another two years in Oman. She said the hours were long and she was paid less than promised.

She returned to Nepal but wasn't able to find work. So, she migrated again, this time for three years, to work as a domestic in Iraq.

SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sharmila Rai Gurung, Farmer and Former Migrant Worker:
“I worked in two different places. At first, it was difficult. I had to do the work of three, four people. When I had extra time, they even made me clean the snow on the roof.”

She finally had enough and returned back home. That's when she heard about the ILO-DFID program and its' Nepalese partner organisation, POURAKHI.

The program targets 40,000 Nepalese women and girls at risk for migrant work, offering vocational training and small business management skills. For those who decide to work abroad, the program offers skills such as cooking, cleaning and basic language training.

Better informed and trained, the young women feel more secure in their new environment, and their employers are more satisfied.

Families attend meetings to learn more about the possibilities and the risks of migration.

This is done with the help of peer educators and social mobilizers, women from their region trained to awareness about working abroad. From time to time Sharmila also speaks at the meetings, sharing her experience as a migrant worker.

SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sangita Pokharel, Social Mobilizer:
“We orient women in the empowerment process. We give them information and help them to get in touch with other agencies and government offices.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Bharati Sharma Pokharel, National Project Coordinator, CO-Kathmandu:
“They are able now to make socio-economic analysis and based on it they have been making form choice of decision on migration. They are many who have analysed and based on it, they have decided to stay back in Nepal looking after other employment, receiving other vocational trainings.”

Thanks to her training Sharmila now earns more income at home in Nepal than she earned as a domestic worker abroad.

She and her husband, who is working in Dubai, have already bought a piece of land where they plan to build a house, and build up their poultry breeding business.

For Sharmila and thousands of other men and women, the ILO project has given them new understandin
STORYLINE
AL / MIGRANTS
TRT: 03:13
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: NEPALI / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: DECEMBER 2016, NEPAL

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, Sharmila Rai Gurung feeding chicken
2. Various shots, Gurung outside coop
3. SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sharmila Rai Gurung, Farmer and Former Migrant Worker:
“Before, the situation at home was not good. My younger sisters and brothers were very young, there were nine of us.”
4. Various shots, Gurung feeding goats
5. Various shots, Gurung washing cooking utensils
6. Med shot, Gurung walking through doorway
7. SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sharmila Rai Gurung, Farmer and Former Migrant Worker:
“I worked in two different places. At first, it was difficult. I had to do the work of three, four people. When I had extra time, they even made me clean the snow on the roof.”
8. Various shots, city views
9. Various shots, classroom
10. Various shots, women in vocational training workshops
11. Various shots, social mobilizer visiting family
12. Various shots, Social Mobilizer Sangita Pokharel at work
13. SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sangita Pokharel, Social Mobilizer:
“We orient women in the empowerment process. We give them information and help them to get in touch with other agencies and government offices.”
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Bharati Sharma Pokharel, National Project Coordinator, CO-Kathmandu:
“They are able now to make socio-economic analysis and based on it they have been making form choice of decision on migration. They are many who have analysed and based on it, they have decided to stay back in Nepal looking after other employment, receiving other vocational trainings.”
15. Various shots, Gurung feeding chicken
16. Various shots, Gurung and family looking at photographs

STORYLNE:

Every year, thousands of young women from Nepal leave their country to work abroad. But many who make the decision don't have the basic skills needed for their new jobs overseas. And very few know how they may be at risk for abuse and exploitation. The ILO-DFID "Work in Freedom" program offers vocational and skills training for Nepalese women, helping them to make a more informed choice about working abroad.

Sharmila Rai Gurung grows vegetables and breeds poultry on a small plot of land next to the house she shares with her mother in law and younger brothers. The house was badly damaged by the 2015 earthquake that devastated parts of Nepal.

But Sharmila's life was once very different. She spent 7 years abroad as a migrant worker. She felt she had no choice.

SOUNDBITE (Nepal) Sharmila Rai Gurung, Farmer and Former Migrant Worker:
“Before, the situation at home was not good. My younger sisters and brothers were very young, there were nine of us.”

Some friends spoke to me they said that if we went to a foreign country, we would be able to make money.

Sharmila was just 16 at the time. Using a passport giving her age as 26, she travelled via India to Saudi Arabia where she did domestic work for 2 years, then another two years in Oman. She said the hours were long and she was paid less than promised.

She returned to Nepal but wasn't able to find work. So, she migrated again, this time for three years, to work as a domestic in Iraq.

SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sharmila Rai Gurung, Farmer and Former Migrant Worker:
“I worked in two different places. At first, it was difficult. I had to do the work of three, four people. When I had extra time, they even made me clean the snow on the roof.”

She finally had enough and returned back home. That's when she heard about the ILO-DFID program and its' Nepalese partner organisation, POURAKHI.

The program targets 40,000 Nepalese women and girls at risk for migrant work, offering vocational training and small business management skills. For those who decide to work abroad, the program offers skills such as cooking, cleaning and basic language training.

Better informed and trained, the young women feel more secure in their new environment, and their employers are more satisfied.

Families attend meetings to learn more about the possibilities and the risks of migration.

This is done with the help of peer educators and social mobilizers, women from their region trained to awareness about working abroad. From time to time Sharmila also speaks at the meetings, sharing her experience as a migrant worker.

SOUNDBITE (Nepali) Sangita Pokharel, Social Mobilizer:
“We orient women in the empowerment process. We give them information and help them to get in touch with other agencies and government offices.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Bharati Sharma Pokharel, National Project Coordinator, CO-Kathmandu:
“They are able now to make socio-economic analysis and based on it they have been making form choice of decision on migration. They are many who have analysed and based on it, they have decided to stay back in Nepal looking after other employment, receiving other vocational trainings.”

Thanks to her training Sharmila now earns more income at home in Nepal than she earned as a domestic worker abroad.

She and her husband, who is working in Dubai, have already bought a piece of land where they plan to build a house, and build up their poultry breeding business.

For Sharmila and thousands of other men and women, the ILO project has given them new understanding about the risks of working abroad and how to protect themselves, as well as a new perspective on what they might be able to achieve, at home in Nepal.
Category
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed181206h