GENEVA / BACHELET HUMAN RIGHTS

05-Dec-2018 00:04:01
Speaking to journalists in Geneva on Wednesday, the High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet warned that an at least 7,000 people in Deir-Ez-Zor province were trapped, amid efforts to dislodge ISIL from one of their last strongholds in Syria. UNTV CH
Size
Format
Acquire
575.6 MB
HD PAL
275.86 MB
SD PAL
576 MB
HD NTSC
Description
STORY: GENEVA / BACHELET HUMAN RIGHTS
TRT: 4:01
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 05 DECEMBER 2018 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST

1. Exterior shot, Palais des Nations.
2. Wide shot, journalists, podium.
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“It doesn’t matter from which region of the world she lives, which ethnic group she pertains, which religion she has or culture she has, doesn’t want its child to be born adequately, to have food, to be warm when it’s cold; so I believe it’s universal, if you read all the articles, I mean, all of them speak about what people really want for their lives.”
4. Med shot, journalists.
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“So I’m really disappointed because I feel that probably what happens in today’s world is that many leaders look at the polls and see the, what people, I mean, instead of leading and giving examples as I was mentioning before, they are following the polls and see if people are concerned about migrants, fear about migrants and so on.”
6. Med shot, journalists, TV cameras.
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“I hope in the case of the migrants in Central America that the ones who are refugees and are asylum seekers will be accepted in a reasonable time, but in any minute, I think they should be treated as human beings, have…some of them will be accepted probably in the US and some of them not, and the President of Mexico just in office, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, has said that he will look after the migrants.”
8. Med shot, journalists.
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“I think that all sides should work to resolve the situation through calm discussion and dialogue and I know the effort of the Government is to engage in dialogue with political leaders and representatives of the protesters and I hope that goes well, because I think they have the right to protest peacefully.”
10. Close up, photographers.
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“He made a very strong commitment with a special decree in hand to ensure that the truth will be brought, there will be justice and there won’t be impunity. So I think that’s a real important issue in Mexico’s situation that I wanted to bring, because it was with the families, the families will be part, there will be a commission where the families will be part, the lawyers of the families and as I said, at least three ministries, and the judicial system, so I think it is a very important issue step for those families since 2014, having waited to know what happens to them.”
12. Med shot, TV cameras.
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“These civilians are of course frightened and stuck between the intensifications of the airstrikes and bombardments against ISIL on one hand, and also being prevented from leaving the areas under ISIL’s control on the other hand. So, we have also reports of ISIL executing civilians perceived as cooperating with the SDF (Syrian Defence Forces) or with other parties to the conflict.”
14. Med shot, journalist.
SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“So we are really concerned about that. And we believe that all parties to the conflict including all States conducting operations against ISIL have an obligation under humanitarian international law to protect civilians and civilian infrastructure at all times.”
15. Med shot, journalists.
16. Med shot, TV cameras.
17. Med shot, journalists.
18. Med shot, OHCHR spokesperson.

STORYLINE

Speaking to journalists in Geneva on Wednesday, the High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet warned that an at least 7,000 people in Deir-Ez-Zor province were trapped, amid efforts to dislodge ISIL from one of their last strongholds in Syria.

“These civilians are of course frightened and stuck between the intensifications of the airstrikes and bombardments against ISIL on one hand, and also being prevented from leaving the areas under ISIL’s control on the other hand,” Bachelet said. “We have also reports of ISIL executing civilians perceived as cooperating with the SDF (Syrian Democratic Forces) or with other parties to the conflict.”

In an appeal to the extremists, the High Commissioner urged them to remove all military personnel and objects from civilian areas as required by international law.
“So, we are really concerned about that. And we believe that all parties to the conflict including all States conducting operations against ISIL have an obligation under humanitarian international law to protect civilians and civilian infrastructure at all times.”

Bachelet’s comments come five days from the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in her words, an aspirational treatise when it was drawn up, whose principles have permeated virtually every area of international law.

Dismissing suggestions that the text’s 30 Articles reflected a western view of human rights, Bachelet insisted on its universality, taking the example of mothers everywhere.

“It doesn’t matter from which region of the world she lives, which ethnic group she pertains, which religion she has or culture she has, doesn’t want its child to be born adequately, to have food, to be warm when it’s cold,” she said. “So, I believe it’s universal, if you read all the articles, I mean, all of them speak about what people really want for their lives.”

While such modern-day challenges such as artificial intelligence and climate change are not mentioned in the Universal Declaration, “its precepts are so fundamental that they can be applied to every new dilemma”, the High Commissioner insisted.
Noting the fact that the document is also “remarkably lacking in sexist language”, Bachelet explained that women had played a prominent role in the drafting process – not just Eleanor Roosevelt, who chaired the drafting committee, but also women from Denmark, Pakistan, Eastern Europe and Latin America.

Their contribution is reflected in the final document, which aside from the two references to “himself and his family”, refers to “everyone”, “all” or “no one” throughout.

The declaration also provides protection for specific minority groups, such as those with disabilities and the LGBTI community, Ms Bachelet continued, quoting from it to highlight how everyone is entitled to all the freedoms it contains “without distinction of any kind such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status”.

Seventy years after its adoption, the work of the Universal Declaration in encouraging States to provide opportunities for everyone and protecting them “is far from over”, Bachelet warned.

She called on world leaders to set an example to the people who had voted for them, notably on the issue of migration, amid a rise in xenophobia and hate speech, and the anticipated withdrawal by a number of countries from the Global Compact on Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, which is due to be adopted in Morocco in four days.

“So I’m really disappointed because I feel that probably what happens in today’s world is that many leaders look at the polls and see the, what people, I mean, instead of leading and giving examples as I was mentioning before, they are following the polls and see if people are concerned about migrants, fear about migrants and so on.”

Turning to the 7,000-strong migrant caravan that left Central America and has now reached the Mexico-US border, the High Commissioner outlined the complexity of the situation: “I hope in the case of the migrants in Central America that the ones who are refugees and are asylum seekers will be accepted in a reasonable time, but in any minute, I think they should be treated as human beings, have…some of them will be accepted probably in the US and some of them not, and the President of Mexico just in office, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, has said that he will look after the migrants.”

Staying with the freshly elected Mexican President, Bachelet welcomed the significance of his commitment to uncover what had happened to 43 students who went missing from Ayotzinapa in Iguala, Guerrero state.

According to the UN human rights office (OHCHR), the students were last seen as they were preparing to stage a protest in September 2014.

“He made a very strong commitment with a special decree in hand to ensure that the truth will be brought, there will be justice and there won’t be impunity,” Bachelet said. “So I think that’s a real important issue in Mexico’s situation that I wanted to bring, because it was with the families, the families will be part, there will be a commission where the families will be part, the lawyers of the families and as I said, at least three ministries, and the judicial system, so I think it is a very important issue step for those families since 2014, having waited to know what happens to them.”

Asked about the “yellow vest” protests in France, the High Commissioner condemned the use of violence and encouraged talks between the Government and demonstrators.

“I think that all sides should work to resolve the situation through calm discussion and dialogue,” she said, “and I know the effort of the Government is to engage in dialogue with political leaders and representatives of the protesters and I hope that goes well, because I think they have the right to protest peacefully.”
Category
Personal Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed181205a