YEMEN / HODEIDAH HUNGER

08-Nov-2018 00:02:29
Due to rapidly deteriorating situation in war-torn Yemen, World Food Programme (WFP) warned that the current fighting at the port City of Hodeidah must stop as the number of people that WFP plans to feed increased from eight million to 14 million people. WFP
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STORY: YEMEN / HODEIDAH HUNGER
TRT: 2:29
SOURCE: WFP
RESTRICTION: PLEASE CREDIT WFP ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: JULY 2018 / JULY 2017
SHOTLIST
25-26 JULY 2018, HODEIDAH CITY

1. Various shots, general view of streets of Hodeidah city

26 JULY 2018, HODEIDAH CITY

2. Various shots, port of Hodeidah
3. Various shots, WFP warehouse destroyed in the fighting
4. Various shots, the port of Hodeidah is Yemen’s lifeline and the only way that food and fuel get into the country. Yemen imports 90 percent of its food needs

8 NOVEMBER 2018, ROME, ITALY

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Amer Daoudi, Senior Director of Operations:
"Hodeidah has the capacity to handle almost 70 per cent of all the imports for Yemen; if that access is not available, we will see a catastrophic situation inside Yemen and the lives of the people will be at stake. WFP is scaling up to meet the needs of 14 million people and Hodeidah is a critical pipeline for us to meet the needs of those people."

26 JULY 2017, AL THAWARA HOSPITAL, HODEIDAH

6. Various shots, children in hospital

25 July 2018, HODEIDAH

7. Various shots, displaced people at a humanitarian aid distribution site
STORYLINE
Due to rapidly deteriorating situation in war-torn Yemen, World Food Programme (WFP) warned that the current fighting at the port City of Hodeidah must stop as the number of people that WFP plans to feed increased from eight million to 14 million people.

The city of Hodeidah has become militarized, trenches dug in the streets blocked by barricades and roadblocks. In July 2018, about one half of the population had fled and those that remained were bracing for more fighting.

The port of Hodeidah is Yemen’s lifeline and the only way that food and fuel get into the country. Yemen imports 90 percent of its food needs.

SOUNDBITE (English) Amer Daoudi, Senior Director of Operations, World Food Programme (WFP):
"Hodeidah has the capacity to handle almost 70 per cent of all the imports for Yemen; if that access is not available, we will see a catastrophic situation inside Yemen and the lives of the people will be at stake. WFP is scaling up to meet the needs of 14 million people and Hodeidah is a critical pipeline for us to meet the needs of those people."

Children in Hodeidah where malnutrition rates are among the worst in Yemen are sometimes too weak to open their mouths and eat the special food they are given to treat malnourishment.

WFP provides special nutrition to children for the treatment and prevention of malnutrition in Yemen.

At the Severely Acute Malnutrition Treatment Centre, malnourished baby are being fed with nasogastric feeding tube.

According to WFP, Yemen is the largest hunger crisis in the world. Millions of people are living on the edge of famine and the situation is getting worse by the day.

An Integrated Phase Classification assessment done in October and to be published this month will give a more precise picture of food insecurity in Yemen. The last IPC report (March 2017) put the numbers in the Emergency category of food insecurity (Phase 4) at 6.8 million people. It is expected that, in the forthcoming IPC, the number could rise to 12 or even 14 million people – this would mean nearly half the population having so little to eat that they are just one step away from starvation.

WFP’s current target of providing food assistance to 8 million people is budgeted at US$125 million per month. As the food security situation deteriorates and WFP prepares to scale up its food and nutrition programmes, it is clear our funding requirements are set to increase accordingly.

WFP also says that the value of the Yemeni Riyal has halved since July, losing 21 per cent of its value in September alone and over 200 per cent of its pre-crisis purchasing power. The price of most basic food items has increased by more than 30 per cent in just four months. More than half a million jobs have been lost since the beginning of the conflict and an estimated 1.2 million government employees have not received their salaries for more than two years.
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