WHO / AFRICA ENVIRONMENT

07-Nov-2018 00:02:54
Aiming to identify emerging environmental threats to people’s health and agree on a strategic action plan for the region, African ministers of health and environment are meeting for the Third Interministerial Conference on Health and Environment in Libreville, Gabon. WHO
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STORY: WHO / AFRICA ENVIRONMENT
TRT: 02:54
SOURCE: WHO / UNEP
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 5 - 7 NOVEMBER 2018, LIBREVILLE, GABON / FILE
SHOTLIST
6 NOVEMBER 2018, LIBREVILLE, GABON

1. Wide shot, Photographers taking photos of panelists to the conference
2. Med shot, panelists
3. Various shots, WHO’s Regional Director for Africa, Matshidiso Moeti, speaking from the podium
4. Various shots, family photo

5 NOVEMBER 2018, LIBREVILLE, GABON

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Matshidiso Moeti, Regional Director for Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The environment has a profound impact on the health of people in Africa as it does all over the world. It’s through the air people breathe, if it is contaminated, through water and sanitation and through climate change. And it affects in Africa, we estimate, almost one in four of illness in the region.”

FILE – UNEP – 2018, KIBERA, NAIROBI, KENYA

6. Wide shot, plastic and other trash in stream

5 NOVEMBER 2018, LIBREVILLE, GABON

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Matshidiso Moeti, Regional Director for Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It’s ten years since we held the first conference here in 2008, and I believe we have done a lot. First of all, we have established within the United Nations a very strong partnership between WHO and the United Nations Environment Programme. And together we’ve managed to work at the country level with ministries and secretaries of health and environment; have helped them to establish a common platform in some countries for joint analysis of risks of vulnerabilities, and also development of joint plans.”

FILE – UNEP – 2018, KIBERA, NAIROBI, KENYA

8. Various shots, plastic and other trash in drainage ditch

5 NOVEMBER 2018, LIBREVILLE, GABON

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Matshidiso Moeti, Regional Director for Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Clearly the mechanisms have been put in place, the tools have been developed, and a lot of experience has been gained. One of the observations that we make is that the financing has not been available to the extent that it could have been to scale up some of these interventions that have been discovered. So, one of our strong expectations now is that with this experience of ten years, with the lessons we have learnt about what works, and with the opportunities of advice, some of the financing mechanisms that have sprung up in the last few years, we can go much further.”

FILE – UNEP – 2018, KIBERA, NAIROBI, KENYA

10. Wide shot, contaminated pool of water

7 NOVEMBER 2018, LIBREVILLE, GABON

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Juliette Biao Koudenoukpo, Africa Office, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP):
“The joint action plans health and environment that have been developed by counties, has to move now to the step of implementation. We need to really to turn the policies into concrete action through innovative solutions, and these innovative solutions is really the focus of the discussion at this conference.”

FILE – UNEP – 2018, KIBERA, NAIROBI, KENYA

12. Various shots, plastic and other trash in streams, paths, and roads
STORYLINE
Aiming to identify emerging environmental threats to people’s health and agree on a strategic action plan for the region, African ministers of health and environment are meeting for the Third Interministerial Conference on Health and Environment in Libreville, Gabon.

In the African region, 23 percent of deaths are linked to the environment. This is the highest for any region in the world on a per capita basis (deaths per 100,000).

SOUNDBITE (English) Matshidiso Moeti, Regional Director for Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The environment has a profound impact on the health of people in Africa as it does all over the world. It’s through the air people breathe, if it is contaminated, through water and sanitation and through climate change. And it affects in Africa, we estimate, almost one in four of illness in the region.”

While the continent has long been plagued by problems relating to access to safe drinking water, inadequate sanitation and poor infrastructure, pollution, new environmental threats have emerged, including climate change and rapid and unplanned urbanization.

SOUNDBITE (English) Matshidiso Moeti, Regional Director for Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It’s ten years since we held the first conference here in 2008, and I believe we have done a lot. First of all, we have established within the United Nations a very strong partnership between WHO and the United Nations Environment Programme. And together we’ve managed to work at the country level with ministries and secretaries of health and environment; have helped them to establish a common platform in some countries for joint analysis of risks of vulnerabilities, and also development of joint plans.”

Nearly 300 delegates including Health, Environment and Finance Ministers, as well as representatives from regional political and economic organizations, big cities, multilateral agencies and experts from 54 countries in Africa will participate in the Conference.

SOUNDBITE (English) Matshidiso Moeti, Regional Director for Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Clearly the mechanisms have been put in place, the tools have been developed, and a lot of experience has been gained. One of the observations that we make is that the financing has not been available to the extent that it could have been to scale up some of these interventions that have been discovered. So, one of our strong expectations now is that with this experience of ten years, with the lessons we have learnt about what works, and with the opportunities of advice, some of the financing mechanisms that have sprung up in the last few years, we can go much further.”

The conference comes a decade after the historic endorsement of the Libreville Declaration by the African Ministers of Health and Environment which committed governments to take the required measures to stimulate synergies between health, environment and other relevant sectors.

SOUNDBITE (English) Juliette Biao Koudenoukpo, Africa Office, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP):
“The joint action plans health and environment that have been developed by counties, has to move now to the step of implementation. We need to really to turn the policies into concrete action through innovative solutions, and these innovative solutions is really the focus of the discussion at this conference.”

The conference jointly organized by the government of Gabon, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), will discuss from 6 to 9 November, how to turn health and environmental policies into action.
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