SOUTH SUDAN / FORMER CHILD SOLDIERS

07-Nov-2018 00:02:33
Members of the Security Council Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict are visiting South Sudan to hear from young people who have suffered most during the war. UNMISS
Size
Format
Acquire
363.27 MB
HD PAL
176.42 MB
SD PAL
362.89 MB
HD NTSC
DESCRIPTION
STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / FORMER CHILD SOLDIERS
TRT: 2:33
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ARABIC /ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 7 NOVEMBER 2018, PIBOR, BOR SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
1. Various shorts, former child soldier tailoring
2. Med short, Ambassador Olof Skoog talking to former child soldier tailoring
3. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) James Korok, Former Child Soldier:
“Before I joined the war, I had no ability to support my family but now I am working, I can make some clothes, like school uniforms, to help my family.”
4. Various shorts, former child soldiers doing veterinary practice
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Olof Skoog, Ambassador of Sweden to the UN and Chair of the Security Council Working Group on Children And Armed Conflict:
“The war is taking a very, very big toll on the children of this country and the scar remains deep so it is very important now to turn a corner, to work very actively with the children.”
6. Various shorts, meeting with government authorities in Pibor
7. Various shorts, group photo with government authorities
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Olof Skoog, Ambassador of Sweden to the UN and Chair of the Security Council Working Group on Children And Armed Conflict:
“I think you also realize, when you meet these kids and you see the work that is needed to fully reintegrate them, that there is a lot of resources needed, a lot of time and patience and some of those resources, I think, are still lacking, especially in Pibor, as we saw today.”
9. Various shorts, former child soldiers doing carpentry work
10. Various shorts, former child soldiers doing beds
STORYLINE
James Korok is just nineteen-years-old but has already experienced a lifetime of pain fighting as a child soldier in the civil war in South Sudan. He is one of the lucky ones. Released by the armed forces in remote Pibor, James is back in school and earning US$60 a week after being taught how to be a tailor.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) James Korok, Former Child Soldier:
“Before I joined the war, I had no ability to support my family but now I am working, I can make some clothes, like school uniforms, to help my family.”
These young men trained by Veterinaires Sans Frontieres Germany to be animal health officers are guaranteed jobs given South Sudan’s dependence on its cattle industry for economic survival. It is hoped that programmes like this can be expanded so that many other South Sudanese children get the opportunity to achieve their dreams.

Chaired by the Sweden’s Ambassador Olof Skoog, the Security Council Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict is advocating for stronger protections and an end to gross violations, including maiming and killing, rape and sexual violence and the forcible recruitment of children.

SOUNDBITE (English) Olof Skoog, Ambassador of Sweden to the UN and Chair of the Security Council Working Group on Children And Armed Conflict:
“The war is taking a very, very big toll on the children of this country and the scar remains deep so it is very important now to turn a corner, to work very actively with the children.”

Children in South Sudan are also suffering from rampant intercommunal violence, including brutal incidents of cattle raiding, where many children are killed or abducted. There is a need for more investment in schools and training opportunities to ensure that former soldiers learn to support themselves rather than turning to criminality or fighting to survive.

SOUNDBITE (English) Olof Skoog, Ambassador of Sweden to the UN and Chair of the Security Council Working Group on Children And Armed Conflict:
“I think you also realize, when you meet these kids and you see the work that is needed to fully reintegrate them, that there is a lot of resources needed, a lot of time and patience and some of those resources, I think, are still lacking, especially in Pibor, as we saw today.”

Providing counselling and psycho-social support for young people like James is vital but there is a lack of funding to deal with the large numbers of children being demobilized.
Category
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed181107a