UN / UNPOL ORGANIZED CRIME

06-Nov-2018 00:02:40
A UN official in charge of Rule of Law and Security Institutions told the Security Council today that “countries in conflict or emerging from conflict are particularly vulnerable to organized crime” and that “the rise of asymmetric threats and non-state actors has blurred the lines” between responsibilities of police and military. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / UNPOL ORGANIZED CRIME
TRT: 2:40
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 6 NOVEMBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT

1. Wide shot, exterior, UN Headquarters

6 NOVEMBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. Zoom in, Council’s president gavel
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexandre Zouev, Assistant Secretary-General for Rule of Law and Security Institutions:
“Often characterized by porous borders, scarce socio-economic opportunities, weak state authority and prevailing corruption, countries in conflict or emerging from conflict are particularly vulnerable to organized crime.”
5. Cutaway, Police Commissioners at the meeting
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexandre Zouev, Assistant Secretary-General for Rule of Law and Security Institutions:
“Historically, organized crime has been a matter for the police, while the military responded to violent conflict. The rise of asymmetric threats and non-state actors has blurred the lines between the two.”
7. Cutaway, delegates
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Alexandre Zouev, Assistant Secretary-General for Rule of Law and Security Institutions:
“This new normal—where networks are looser, and alliances of convenience are forged—requires a holistic response rooted in coherence of practice and approach.”
9. Med shot, delegates and Commissioners at the meeting
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Tuesday Reitano, Deputy Director, Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime:
“All evidence suggests that the scale of illicit markets is staggering. And that their intersection with contemporary conflict is incontrovertible. The sources of revenue that fund non-state armed and terrorist groups are diversifying; they are increasingly based on criminal activities, and this phenomenon is sustaining conflicts worldwide. Illegal exploitation and taxation of gold, oil and other natural resources are sources of income that are overtaking traditional threat finance sectors, such as kidnapping for ransom and drug trafficking.”
11. Cutaway, delegates
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Tuesday Reitano, Deputy Director, Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime:
“Organized crime is a threat to the three pillars on which the UN System is based: human rights; peace and security; and good governance and development. If we are to prevent conflict more effectively, and build sustainable peace, then we need a more comprehensive and effective response to organized crime. We urge the Security Council with its leadership therefore, to move this issue from the margins to the mainstream of the UN’s work – particularly its work in the field.”
13. Wide shot, meeting
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Unaisi Lutu Vuniwaqa, Police Commissioner of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“Evidence indicates that women police officers and mixed FPUs act as a catalyst that promote confidence, encourage survivors of sexual violence to report incidents, and enable civilians to share strategic information that contributes to the early warning system of the mission.”
15. Wide shot, meeting
STORYLINE
A UN official in charge of Rule of Law and Security Institutions told the Security Council today that “countries in conflict or emerging from conflict are particularly vulnerable to organized crime” and that “the rise of asymmetric threats and non-state actors has blurred the lines” between responsibilities of police and military.

Alexandre Zouev, Assistant Secretary-General for Rule of Law and Security Institutions told the Council’s members “historically, organized crime has been a matter for the police, while the military responded to violent conflict. The rise of asymmetric threats and non-state actors has blurred the lines between the two.”

Zouev was speaking at the session of the United Nations Security Council focused on UN policing. Briefings of the Council with the participation of UN Police Commissioners are held every year.

The Assistant Secretary-General said that in West Africa and the Sahel, routes for the illegal trafficking and smuggling of people, weapons and drugs go through areas controlled by terrorist groups, with smugglers and traffickers paying for the right of passage. Also, in Nigeria, Zoueve said, Boko Haram has been involved in trafficking of drugs, people and natural resources.

He concluded “this new normal—where networks are looser, and alliances of convenience are forged—requires a holistic response rooted in coherence of practice and approach.”

At the request of Sweden, Tuesday Reitano, deputy director of the Geneva-based Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime briefed the Security Council on the findings of organization’s field research into organized crime, which, according to Reitano, generates annually about USD 31.5 billion worth of illicit profits in conflict areas only.

She said “all evidence suggests that the scale of illicit markets is staggering and that their intersection with contemporary conflict is incontrovertible” adding that “the sources of revenue that fund non-state armed and terrorist groups are diversifying; they are increasingly based on criminal activities, and this phenomenon is sustaining conflicts worldwide. Illegal exploitation and taxation of gold, oil and other natural resources are sources of income that are overtaking traditional threat finance sectors, such as kidnapping for ransom and drug trafficking.”

Reitano warned that “organized crime is a threat to the three pillars on which the UN System is based: human rights; peace and security; and good governance and development.”

She said “if we are to prevent conflict more effectively, and build sustainable peace, then we need a more comprehensive and effective response to organized crime. We urge the Security Council with its leadership therefore, to move this issue from the margins to the mainstream of the UN’s work – particularly its work in the field.”

Also briefing the Council, Unaisi Lutu Vuniwaqa, Police Commissioner of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) said that UNMISS has made great efforts to advance gender sensitive policing by introducing mixed Formed Police Units (FPU) where some 50 percent are women.

Vuniwaqa said “evidence indicates that women police officers and mixed FPUs act as a catalyst that promote confidence, encourage survivors of sexual violence to report incidents, and enable civilians to share strategic information that contributes to the early warning system of the mission.”
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