UN / LIBYA ICC

02-Nov-2018 00:02:22
International Criminal Court (ICC) Chief Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda told the Security Council that there could be “no justice for the victims” of crimes committed in Libya unless ICC suspects are “arrested and transferred to the Court to stand trial.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / LIBYA ICC
TRT: 2:22
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 02 NOVEMBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

OCTOBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Chinese ambassador presiding over Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Fatou Bensouda, Chief Prosecutor, International Criminal Court:
“The journeys these people embark upon can quickly turn into true nightmare scenarios where they become victims of the darkest side of human nature; where they are preyed upon mercilessly, and their vulnerabilities exploited with no regard for decency or the rule of law. My Office continues to receive evidence of serious crimes committed against migrants in Libya. These alleged crimes include killings, sexual violence, torture and enslavement.”
4. Med shot, Libyan delegate
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Fatou Bensouda, Chief Prosecutor, International Criminal Court:
“There can be no justice for the victims, and the aims of prevention and deterrence are hindered, unless ICC suspects are arrested and transferred to the Court to stand trial. Contrary to the urging of members of this Council, and despite concerted efforts by my Office and the Registry of the Court, not one suspect in the Libya situation has been surrendered to the ICC.”
6. Pan left, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Fatou Bensouda, Chief Prosecutor, International Criminal Court:
“If ICC fugitives are permitted to remain at large, the mandate of the Court to hold those responsible for the most serious crimes of concern to the international community will continue to be frustrated, and the Council's referral of the situation in Libya to the ICC will be rendered ineffective.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Giuma Fares, Minister Plenipotentiary, Permanent Mission of Libya to the United Nations:
“While we completely recognize the existence of some delay in perusing and prosecuting suspects, we reaffirm that this delay does not imply the national judiciary’s lack of resolve to prosecute and punish those who have committed crimes. It is a delay that was imposed by the security conditions Libya is witnessing, which are normal in countries experiencing conflict. Our national judiciary has in fact began the trails of a number of suspects and has issued decisions of convictions for some and acquittals for others.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
International Criminal Court (ICC) Chief Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda told the Security Council that there could be “no justice for the victims” of crimes committed in Libya unless ICC suspects are “arrested and transferred to the Court to stand trial.”

Speaking at the Council today (02 Nov), Bensouda said despite calls from the Security Council and efforts by her office “not one suspect in the Libya situation has been surrendered to the ICC.” She said Saif Al-Islam Gaddafi remained at large despite his self-claimed release from the custody of the Abu-Bakr al-Siddiq Battalion in Zintan over two years ago. She added that Mohamed Khaled Al-Tuhamy, former head of the Libyan Internal Security Agency, and Mahmoud Mustafa Busayf Al-Werfalli, a commander in the Al-Saiqa Brigade operating in and around Benghazi, also remain at large.

Bensouda stressed that if ICC fugitives are permitted to remain at large, the mandate of the Court to hold those responsible for the most serious crimes of concern to the international community will continue to be frustrated, and the Council's referral of the situation in Libya to the ICC will be rendered ineffective.”

The ICC Prosecutor noted that armed groups in Libya used violence to exert control over State institutions, commit serious human rights violations, and abuse and exploit detainees in unregulated prisons and places of detention throughout the country. She said her office also remained focused on the alleged crimes committed against migrants transiting through Libya. She added, “The journeys these people embark upon can quickly turn into true nightmare scenarios where they become victims of the darkest side of human nature; where they are preyed upon mercilessly, and their vulnerabilities exploited with no regard for decency or the rule of law. My Office continues to receive evidence of serious crimes committed against migrants in Libya. These alleged crimes include killings, sexual violence, torture and enslavement.”

Libyan diplomat Giuma Fares said his country has cooperated with the ICC to achieve justice despite not being a signatory party to the Rome Statute. He said while his Government recognizes “the existence of some delay in perusing and prosecuting suspects,” it reaffirms that the delay “does not imply the national judiciary’s lack of resolve to prosecute and punish those who have committed crimes.” Fares attributed the delay to the security situation in Libya, adding that the Libyan national judiciary “has in fact began the trails of a number of suspects and has issued decisions of convictions for some and acquittals for others.”
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