UN / PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

25-Oct-2018 00:03:06
United Nations Member States today unanimously agreed to the Declaration of Astana, vowing to strengthen their primary health care systems as an essential step toward achieving universal health coverage. UNIFEED / FILE
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STORY: UN / PRIMARY HEALTH CARE
TRT: 03:06
SOURCE: UNIFEED / WHO / WFP
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WFP FOOTAGE ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 25 OCTOBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - WHO - 24 - 25 JULY 2018, VIETNAM

1. Various shots, TB patients at the Vietnam National Lung Hospital
2. Close up, child in hospital
3. Med shot, mother and child

25 OCTOBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Willibald Zeck, Head of Global Maternal, Newborn and Adolescent Health Program, UNICEF:
“The declaration really tries to reflect the changes that we had in the last 10, 20, 30 years and how can we build primary care better into the health systems. And that would include universal health care, but also looking not at the patient, at the first contact as a patient, but look at the community and how we can engage communities and make sure that they are empowered.”

FILE - WHO - 24 - 25 JULY 2018, VIETNAM

5. Various shots, doctor with patient

25 OCTOBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Willibald Zeck, Head of Global Maternal, Newborn and Adolescent Health Program, UNICEF:
“The challenges are certainly the inequities we are facing. The inequities are between countries, but also within countries. And the quality of care provided is also different between villages sometimes in a very close setting. So, what we are trying to do to promote primary health care is that we have to strengthen the health systems around it, and universal health care becomes a major priority for many governments.”

FILE – WFP - 23 JULY 2018, SAADA, YEMEN

7. Various shots, 11-month-old Malak, testing positive for malnutrition
8. Various shots, severely malnourished children being treated at Saada City main hospital

25 OCTOBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Willibald Zeck, Head of Global Maternal, Newborn and Adolescent Health Program, UNICEF:
“We need financial commitment from governments on the national level to make sure that funding that is available at the national level can trickle down to districts or to the sub-national level where primary health care needs to be triggered and needs to be strengthened. And for that we need their commitments, but also to make sure that funding that’s available is used in the right way.”

FILE – WHO - 2014, MEXICO

10. Various shots, doctor with patient.

25 OCTOBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Willibald Zeck, Head of Global Maternal, Newborn and Adolescent Health Program, UNICEF:
“After the MDG era we have made very good success, great successes in maternal mortality reduction, in child mortality reduction, but the SDGs guide us into a new era where this is still important but non-communicable diseases and other issues are coming up that we are now anticipating.”

FILE – WHO - NOVEMBER 2015, GAMBIA

11. Various shots, pregnant woman getting checked

FILE – WHO - MARCH 2016, EL SALVADOR

12. Med shot, woman holding baby
13. Various shots, pregnant woman getting checked

25 OCTOBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Willibald Zeck, Head of Global Maternal, Newborn and Adolescent Health Program, UNICEF:
“I want to encourage everyone to be really actively engaged in primary health care, from governments down to patients, to communities, to engage in primary health care, to demand for it, and also for service providers to provide services. We know they do a great job, but they need our support to be able to deliver that job in a good, in a very effective way.”

FILE – WHO – AUGUST 2018, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

15. Various shots, local community getting vaccination
STORYLINE
United Nations Member States today (25 Oct) unanimously agreed to the Declaration of Astana, vowing to strengthen their primary health care systems as an essential step toward achieving universal health coverage. The Declaration of Astana reaffirms the historic 1978 Declaration of Alma-Ata, the first time world leaders committed to primary health care.

In New York, the Head of Global Maternal, Newborn and Adolescent Health Program at UNICEF, Willibald Zeck, said the Declaration “tries to reflect the changes that we had in the last 10, 20, 30 years and how can we build primary care better into the health systems.”

While the 1978 Declaration of Alma-Ata laid a foundation for primary health care, progress over the past four decades has been uneven. At least half the world’s population lacks access to essential health services – including care for noncommunicable and communicable diseases, maternal and child health, mental health, and sexual and reproductive health.

Zeck highlighted the challenges presented by inequities in access to primary health care. He said “the inequities are between countries, but also within countries. And the quality of care provided is also different between villages sometimes in a very close setting. So, what we are trying to do to promote primary health care is that we have to strengthen the health systems around it, and universal health care becomes a major priority for many governments.”

The Declaration of Astana comes amid a growing global movement for greater investment in primary health care to achieve universal health coverage. Health resources have been overwhelmingly focused on single disease interventions rather than strong, comprehensive health systems – a gap highlighted by several health emergencies in recent years.

Zeck said “we need financial commitment from governments on the national level to make sure that funding that is available at the national level can trickle down to districts or to the sub-national level where primary health care needs to be triggered and needs to be strengthened.”

He noted that the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) achieved “great successes” in maternal mortality reduction and child mortality reduction, adding that the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) “guide us into a new era where this is still important but non-communicable diseases and other issues are coming up that we are now anticipating.”

Zeck for everyone to be “actively engaged in primary health care, from governments down to patients, to communities, to engage in primary health care, to demand for it, and also for service providers to provide services.”

The Declaration of Astana adopted at the conference, makes pledges in four key areas: to make bold political choices for health across all sectors; to build sustainable primary health care; to empower individuals and communities; and to align stakeholder support to national policies, strategies and plans.

UNICEF and WHO will help governments and civil society to act on the Declaration of Astana and encourage them to back the movement. UNICEF and WHO will also support countries in reviewing the implementation of this Declaration, in cooperation with other partners.

The Global Conference on Primary Health Care is taking place from 25-26 October in Astana, Kazakhstan, co-hosted by WHO, UNICEF and the Government of Kazakhstan. Participants include ministers of health, finance, education and social welfare; health workers and patient advocates; youth delegates and activists; and leaders representing bilateral and multilateral institutions, global health advocacy organizations, civil society, academia, philanthropy, media and the private sector.
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