UN / HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INDEX

14-Sep-2018 00:00:50
The UN Development Programme (UNDP) today released its Human Development Index, which shows that although there have been steady improvements in human development, “there are still major concerns in terms of disparities of quality of life and education.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INDEX
TRT: 0:50
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 14 SEPTEMBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

14 SEPTEMBER 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press room
3. Wide shot, journalists
4. Med shot, journalist
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Farhan Haq, Deputy Spokesperson for the Secretary-General:
(Soundbite starts under cutaway) “The UN Development Programme (UNDP) today released its Human Development Index, which shows that although there have been steady improvements in human development, there are still major concerns in terms of disparities of quality of life and education. The Human Development Index reveals that on average, people are living longer, are more educated and are earning more money. However, there are massive differences among and within countries. This year Norway, Switzerland, Australia, Ireland and Germany top the rankings of the report, while Niger, the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Chad and Burundi have the lowest scores.”
6. Wide shot, press room
STORYLINE
The UN Development Programme (UNDP) today released its Human Development Index, which shows that although there have been steady improvements in human development, “there are still major concerns in terms of disparities of quality of life and education.”

Speaking to reporters in New York today (14 Sep), UN deputy spokesperson Farhan said the Human Development Index revealed that on average, people are living longer, are more educated and are earning more money. He noted however that there are “massive differences among and within countries.”

According to the latest Human Development Index, people living in the very high human development countries can expect to live 19 years longer, and spend seven more years in school, than those living in the group of low human development countries. Haq said, “Norway, Switzerland, Australia, Ireland and Germany top the rankings of the report, while Niger, the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Chad and Burundi have the lowest scores.”

Ireland enjoyed the highest increase in HDI rank between 2012 and 2017 moving up 13 places, while Turkey, the Dominican Republic and Botswana were also developing strongly, each moving up eight places. All three steepest declines in human development ranking were countries in conflict: the Syrian Arab Republic had the largest decrease in HDI rank, falling 27 places, followed by Libya (26 places), and Yemen (20 places).
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