ETHIOPIA / SOUTH SUDAN PEACE AGREEMENT

13-Sep-2018 00:02:04
Marking an important moment in the short life of the world’s youngest nation, the leaders of warring parties in South Sudan, the President Salva Kiir and the former Vice-President Riek Machar came together in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa to sign a new peace agreement. UNMISS
Size
Format
Acquire
294.16 MB
HD PAL
140.48 MB
SD PAL
294.55 MB
HD NTSC
DESCRIPTION
STORY: ETHIOPIA / SOUTH SUDAN PEACE AGREEMENT
TRT: 2:04
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 12 SEPTEMBER 2018, ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA
SHOTLIST
12 SEPTEMBER 2018, ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA

1. Wide shot, IGAD Summit
2. Wide shot, Kiir and Machar shaking hands
3. Med shot, Kiir and Machar at the podium
4. Various shots, delegates
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Mayiik Ayii Deng, Spokesperson for the President of South Sudan:
“We believe that now we are going to scrape around. We are not going to rely on anyone else like before where we are waiting for someone to help us and nobody came.”
6. Various shots, delegates
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Manawa Peter Gatkuoth Spokesperson, People’s Liberation Movement In-Opposition:
“It will take time to end the suffering of the people of South Sudan and I don’t think three years will be enough to build the confidence between the warring parties. Also, to reconcile the people of South Sudan, to bring them together, because, you know, what happened in South Sudan is such a crime against humanity, what happened to the peopI le of South Sudan is not good. It will take time.”
8. Various shots, delegates
9. SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for South Sudan:
“It’s going to be a long process. It is not going to happen overnight. These people have got animosities that go back two decades, three decades even. Some of those will come out but overall they’ve got to put that behind them in the interests of 12 million people in South Sudan who really deserve a better future then they have at the moment.”
10. Various shots, peace agreement signing
STORYLINE
Marking an important moment in the short life of the world’s youngest nation, the leaders of warring parties in South Sudan, the President Salva Kiir and the former Vice-President Riek Machar came together in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa to sign a new peace agreement.

The signing follows 15 months of negotiation led by regional leaders in the aftermath of a series of broken peace deals and ceasefires. The Government said it made significant concessions and believes the agreement will endure because it has been driven by South Sudanese leaders with support from regional counterparts.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mayiik Ayii Deng, Spokesperson for the President of South Sudan:
“We believe that now we are going to scrape around. We are not going to rely on anyone else like before where we are waiting for someone to help us and nobody came.”

The Opposition says that international support is vital if the deal is to succeed. While they look forward to the return of their leader, Riek Machar, who has lived in exile since 2013, they say it will take time to heal old wounds.

SOUNDBITE (English) Manawa Peter Gatkuoth Spokesperson, People’s Liberation Movement In-Opposition:
“It will take time to end the suffering of the people of South Sudan and I don’t think three years will be enough to build the confidence between the warring parties. Also, to reconcile the people of South Sudan, to bring them together, because, you know, what happened in South Sudan is such a crime against humanity, what happened to the people of South Sudan is not good. It will take time.”

Under the new deal, rebel leader Riek Machar will resume his position of a Vice-President in Salva Kiir’s government. However, a similar deal signed in 2015 has collapsed.

SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for South Sudan:
“It’s going to be a long process. It is not going to happen overnight. These people have got animosities that go back two decades, three decades even. Some of those will come out but overall they’ve got to put that behind them in the interests of 12 million people in South Sudan who really deserve a better future then they have at the moment.”

South Sudan plunged into violence in December 2013 when forces loyal to Salva Kiir clashed with those loyal to Riek Machar. Several peace deals signed between warring parties have quickly collapsed.





.
Category
Topical Subjects
Personal Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed180913b