GENEVA / HRC BACHELET GENOCIDE

13-Sep-2018 00:02:22
The odious scourge of genocide remains both a threat and a reality in the 21st century, according to UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. Speaking today at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Michelle Bachelet pointed specifically to abuses committed in recent times against Rohingya and Yazidi populations. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / HRC BACHELET GENOCIDE
TRT: 2:22
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 13 SEPTEMBER 2018 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Exterior, Palais des Nations
2. Wide shot, Human Rights Room
3. Wide shot, podium
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights:
“The “odious scourge” of genocide, as the Convention itself describes it, remains both a threat and a reality in the 21st century. Just over two weeks ago, we were brutally reminded of this. The Council’s Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar issued its shocking report on the military-led campaign of murder, rape and assault against the Rohingya people of Rakhine State. A conservative estimate of 10,000 dead, countless more bereaved, maimed, raped and traumatised, and nearly three-quarters of a million people forced to flee to Bangladesh”.
5. Med shot, Myanmar delegate
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: “Seventy years on, we must take stock of the gravity of recent acts, perpetrated against the Rohingya and Yazidis – and we must do everything possible to hold those responsible to account. Accountability matters – not only because it provides justice for victims and punishment for perpetrator it matters because ending impunity is central to ending genocide”.
7. Med shot, Syrian delegate
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: “Support for the Court is indispensable for both justice and deterrence. I urge all States to support the Court, and in this, the year we commemorate the 20th anniversary of its founding with the Rome Statute, I call upon all remaining countries to sign or ratify the Statute”.
9. Wide shot, delegates
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: “Genocide is always shocking. But it is never committed without clear, multiple warning signs: a pattern of abuse against a group, an intent to harm, a chain of command and finally a brutal and horrifying outcome. In the case of the Rohingya, warning signs abounded: a people oppressed from birth to death, an army answerable to no one, and systematic, state-led human rights violations that went unpunished for decades, including arbitrary deprivation of nationality”.
11. Med shot, delegates
12. Med shot, podium
13. Wide shot, delegates
STORYLINE
The odious scourge of genocide remains both a threat and a reality in the 21st century, according to UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. Speaking Thursday (13 Sep) at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Michelle Bachelet pointed specifically to abuses committed in recent times against Rohingya and Yazidi populations.

The world’s top human rights official spoke at a high-level panel to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Crime of Genocide.

She said “just over two weeks ago, we were brutally reminded of this. The Council’s Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar issued its shocking report on the military-led campaign of murder, rape and assault against the Rohingya people of Rakhine State. A conservative estimate of 10,000 dead, countless more bereaved, maimed, raped and traumatised, and nearly three-quarters of a million people forced to flee to Bangladesh.”

Bachelet recalled that “seventy years on, we must take stock of the gravity of recent acts, perpetrated against the Rohingya and Yazidis – and we must do everything possible to hold those responsible to account. Accountability matters – not only because it provides justice for victims and punishment for perpetrator it matters because ending impunity is central to ending genocide”.

The High Commissioner defended the importance of the International Criminal Court (ICC) as central pillar of the work to punish --and therefore help prevent -- these gravest forms of international crimes. “We now have the means to bridge, if not eradicate, the impunity gap for international crimes, including genocide”, she said.

The ICC’s Pre-Trial Chamber last week determined that the Court has jurisdiction over alleged crimes such as the forced deportation from Myanmar of Rohingya people, and possibly for other crimes.

Bachelet said “support for the Court is indispensable for both justice and deterrence. I urge all States to support the Court, and in this, the year we commemorate the 20th anniversary of its founding with the Rome Statute, I call upon all remaining countries to sign or ratify the Statute”.

Recognising and acting on warning signs of genocide, including hate speech, remains a key challenge, even 70 years after the convention, Bachelet said.

Human Rights Commissioner said “Genocide is always shocking. But it is never committed without clear, multiple warning signs: a pattern of abuse against a group, an intent to harm, a chain of command and finally a brutal and horrifying outcome. In the case of the Rohingya, warning signs abounded: a people oppressed from birth to death, an army answerable to no one, and systematic, state-led human rights violations that went unpunished for decades, including arbitrary deprivation of nationality”.
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