FAO / WORLD HUNGER REPORT

11-Sep-2018 00:03:16
A new UN report signalled that the number of hungry people in the world is growing, reaching 821 million in 2017 or one in every nine people. FAO
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STORY: FAO / WORLD HUNGER REPORT
TRT: 3:16
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 SEPTEMBER 2018, ROME, ITALY
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, press briefing room
2. SOUNDBITE (English) José Graziano da Silva, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“Unfortunately, the big news are not good news. This is what we see. We need to say that again the third time for me to announce the increase in the number of hungry people in the world. Now we achieved 821 million that are considered undernourished in 2017.”
3. Med shot, audience
4. Close up, screen showing the publication
5. SOUNDBITE (English) José Graziano da Silva, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“Really, not only conflict is responsible for the increase, the impact of climate change is so powerful nowadays on food… that we are stepping behind, we are reversing the positive trends that we have seen along the decades on reducing (the number of) undernourished people and also providing better nutrition.”
6. Med shot, audience
7. SOUNDBITE (French) Gilbert F. Houngbo, President, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD):
“It is now proven that achieving SDG goals by 2030 requires taking things to the next level, that’s say to intensify and focus our responses on what actually works and to increase our sustainable investments in rural transformation.”
8. Med shot, cutaway to audience
9. SOUNDBITE (English) David Beasley, Executive Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“Those of you in the media, you have the obligation to help us to get this message out around the world, because every five second a child is dying from starvation, when there are 300 trillion dollars’ worth of wealth in the world today, that is unacceptable and unexcusable.”
10. Med shot, cutaway to audience
11. SOUNDBITE (English) David Beasley, Executive Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“But climate impact is real, 22 to 23 million of people alone are impacted and forcibly displaced because of the changing climate.”
12. Wide shot, cutaway
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The report we are launching shows that fewer stunted children in the world, that’s good news, that we should all celebrate. But there are significant disparities between regions in Sub-Sahara and Africa has been left behind. We also need to work harder to reduce anemia in women and to address the obesity epidemic.”
14. Med shot, cutaway to audience
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Henrietta H. Fore, Executive Director, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“We can strengthen local and global food system to help more children and families access nutritious food affordable and sustainable diets.”
16. Wide shot, presser
STORYLINE
New evidence continues to signal that the number of hungry people in the world is growing, reaching 821 million in 2017 or one in every nine people, according to The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018 released today.

Limited progress is also being made in addressing the multiple forms of malnutrition, ranging from child stunting to adult obesity, putting the health of hundreds of millions of people at risk.

SOUNDBITE (English) José Graziano da Silva, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“Unfortunately, the big news are not good news. This is what we see. We need to say that again the third time for me to announce the increase in the number of hungry people in the world. Now we achieved 821 million that are considered undernourished in 2017.”

Hunger has been on the rise over the past three years, returning to levels from a decade ago. This reversal in progress sends a clear warning that more must be done and urgently if the Sustainable Development Goal of Zero Hunger is to be achieved by 2030.

The situation is worsening in South America and most regions of Africa, while the decreasing trend in undernourishment that characterized Asia seems to be slowing down significantly.

The annual UN report found that climate variability affecting rainfall patterns and agricultural seasons, and climate extremes such as droughts and floods, are among the key drivers behind the rise in hunger, together with conflict and economic slowdowns.

SOUNDBITE (English) José Graziano da Silva, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“Really, not only conflict is responsible for the increase, the impact of climate change is so powerful nowadays on food… that we are stepping behind, we are reversing the positive trends that we have seen along the decades on reducing (the number of) undernourished people and also providing better nutrition.”

SOUNDBITE (French) Gilbert F. Houngbo, President, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD):
“It is now proven that achieving SDG goals by 2030 requires taking things to the next level, that’s say to intensify and focus our responses on what actually works and to increase our sustainable investments in rural transformation.”

SOUNDBITE (English) David Beasley, Executive Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“Those of you in the media, you have the obligation to help us to get this message out around the world, because every five second a child is dying from starvation, when there are 300 trillion dollars’ worth of wealth in the world today, that is unacceptable and unexcusable.”

SOUNDBITE (English) David Beasley, Executive Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“But climate impact is real, 22 to 23 million of people alone are impacted and forcibly displaced because of the changing climate.”

The report was launched by five UN agencies – The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the World Food Programme (WFP), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

The report calls for implementing and scaling up interventions aimed at guaranteeing access to nutritious foods and breaking the intergenerational cycle of malnutrition. Policies must pay special attention to groups who are the most vulnerable to the harmful consequences of poor food access: infants, children aged under five, school-aged children, adolescent girls, and women.

SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The report we are launching shows that fewer stunted children in the world, that’s good news, that we should all celebrate. But there are significant disparities between regions in Sub-Sahara and Africa has been left behind. We also need to work harder to reduce anemia in women and to address the obesity epidemic.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Henrietta H. Fore, Executive Director, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“We can strengthen local and global food system to help more children and families access nutritious food affordable and sustainable diets.”

At the same time, a sustainable shift must be made towards nutrition-sensitive agriculture and food systems that can provide safe and high-quality food for all.

The report also calls for greater efforts to build climate resilience through policies that promote climate change adaptation and mitigation, and disaster risk reduction.
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