WHO / PHYSICAL ACTIVITY REPORT

04-Sep-2018 00:02:04
Report by the World Health Organization (WHO) says more than a quarter (1.4 billion) of the world’s adult population were insufficiently active in 2016, putting them at greater risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dementia, and some cancers, according to the first study to estimate global physical activity trends over time. WHO
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STORY: WHO / PHYSICAL ACTIVITY REPORT
TRT: 2:04
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 4 SEPTEMBER 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
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1. Wide shot, exterior, WHO Headquarters

4 SEPTEMBER 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Regina Guthold, scientist and study lead author, WHO:
“So with this study we are looking at global and regional levels and trends, in insufficient physical activity. And we found that more than a quarter of the global population are insufficient physical active. But it is not equal between men and women. We have 23% of men that are not sufficiently active, versus 32% of women.”
3. Cutaway, interview
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Regina Guthold, scientist and study lead author, WHO:
“Low income groups, all low-income countries together, had a prevalence of 16% of insufficient physical activity. Middle income groups had a prevalence of 28% and high-income groups of 37%, so we see a very clear pattern here, that wealthier countries have higher levels of inactivity. “
5. Cutaway, report
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Regina Guthold, scientist and study lead author, WHO:
“So, we think that it is linked with urbanization in these countries, industrialization, as countries get wealthier people tend to have more sedentary jobs, they tend to not have the manual farm work or so much manual work anymore, so work typically gets more sedentary.”
7. Wide shot, Gthold and Bull looking at report
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Fiona Bull, Program Manager, Surveillance & Population Based Prevention, Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases WHO:
“The importance physical activity is enormous. First and foremost, it prevents cardiovascular disease, one of the leading killers, so that is heart disease and stroke. The second area is prevention of cancer. Thirdly prevention of diabetes. And all these three are major killers, and causes of premature death in today’s world, in high income and low income. There are more benefits from physical activity. It improves mental health and wellbeing. It can help people learn and work better and prevent falls. So across the lifecourse from the very young to the very old being active has mental, physical and social health benefits.”
9. Med shot, Gthold and Bull looking at report
STORYLINE
Report by the World Health Organization (WHO) says more than a quarter (1.4 billion) of the world’s adult population were insufficiently active in 2016, putting them at greater risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dementia, and some cancers, according to the first study to estimate global physical activity trends over time.

The study was undertaken by researchers from the World Health Organization and published in the Lancet Global Health Journal.

Together, these estimates demonstrate that there has been little progress in improving physical activity levels between 2001 and 2016. The data show that if current trends continue, the 2025 global activity target of a 10% relative reduction in insufficient physical activity will not be met.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Regina Guthold, scientist and study lead author, WHO:
“So with this study we are looking at global and regional levels and trends, in insufficient physical activity. And we found that more than a quarter of the global population are insufficient physical active. But it is not equal between men and women.”

In 2016, around one in three women (32%) and one in four men (23%) worldwide were not reaching the recommended levels of physical activity to stay healthy – ie, at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week.

The new study is based on self-reported activity levels, including activity at work and at home, for transport, and during leisure time, in adults aged 18 years and older from 358 population-based surveys in 168 countries, including 1.9 million participants.

In wealthier countries, the transition towards more sedentary occupations, recreation and motorised transport could explain the higher levels of inactivity, while in lower-income countries, more activity is undertaken at work and for transport, according to the authors.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Regina Guthold, scientist and study lead author, WHO:
“Low income groups, all low-income countries together, had a prevalence of 16% of insufficient physical activity. Middle income groups had a prevalence of 28% and high-income groups of 37%, so we see a very clear pattern here, that wealthier countries have higher levels of inactivity. “

While declines in occupational and domestic physical activity are inevitable as countries prosper, and use of technology increases, governments must provide and maintain infrastructure that promotes increased walking and cycling for transport and active sports and recreation.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Fiona Bull, Program Manager, Surveillance & Population Based Prevention, Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases WHO:
“The importance physical activity is enormous. First and foremost, it prevents cardiovascular disease, one of the leading killers, so that is heart disease and stroke. The second area is prevention of cancer. Thirdly prevention of diabetes. And all these three are major killers, and causes of premature death in today’s world, in high income and low income. There are more benefits from physical activity. It improves mental health and wellbeing. It can help people learn and work better and prevent falls. So across the lifecourse from the very young to the very old being active has mental, physical and social health benefits.”

Countries with the lowest levels of insufficient physical activity in 2016 were Uganda and Mozambique (6% each) while more than half of adults were insufficiently active in Kuwait (67%), American Samoa (53%), Saudi Arabia (53%), and Iraq (52%).

In 55 (33%) of 168 countries, more than a third of the population was insufficiently physically active.
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