UN / CLIMATE SECURITY RISKS

11-Jul-2018 00:02:56
The Deputy Secretary-General, Amina Mohammed, told the Security Council that “climate change is inextricably linked to some of the most pressing security challenges of our time” and added that “it is no coincidence that the countries most vulnerable to climate change are often those most vulnerable to conflict and fragility.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / CLIMATE CHANGE SECURITY RISKS
TRT: 02:56
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ARABIC / RUSSIAN / NATS

DATELINE: 11 JULY 2018, NEW YORK CITY / 03 JULY 2018, WAU, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, UN headquarters

11 JULY 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. Med shot, delegates
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina J. Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Climate change is inextricably linked to some of the most pressing security challenges of our time. It is no coincidence that the countries most vulnerable to climate change are often those most vulnerable to conflict and fragility.”
5. Med shot, delegates
6. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hassan Al- Janabi, Minister of Water Resources, Iraq:
“Climate change and the depletion of water resources destroy the fertility of the soil and turn it into barren land, no human group can live on. It will be forced to migrate to other places, not necessarily less severe, but because of their inability to adapt, due to poverty and vulnerability; living on dwindling water resources or scattered and unpredicted rainfall.”
7. Med shot, delegates
8. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Dmitry Polyanskiy, First Deputy Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations:
“Attempts to use the climate factor as an explanation for socioeconomic and political situations in given countries and regions ultimately draw the conclusion that climate change is jeopardizing security, and yet the champions of these ideas, as a general rule, don’t burden themselves with scientifically sound specific details nor clear explanations of the notion of security, conflict, threat, and stability as regards to climate issues.”
9. Med shot, delegates
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Baron Waqa, President, Republic of Nauru:
“Climate change will be the defining issue of the next century and our preparation is long
overdue, which is why the Pacific SIDS are calling for the appointment of a Special
Representative on Climate and Security. The SRSG would fill a critical gap within the UN
system, as well as provide the Council with information it needs to fulfill its existing mandate.”
11. Wide shot, Council
12. Zoom in, Deputy Prime Minister of Sweden Margot Wallström walks up to podium
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Margot Wallström, Deputy Prime Minister, Sweden:
“This is now the first meeting in the Security Council since 2011 and the third ever on climate related security risks. And it’s clear that the Council also needs to catch up with the reality on the ground, and it’s time to move from the question of whether, if climate change is affecting security to how, and what needs to be done in response.”
14. Pan right, Wallström walks away
STORYLINE
The Deputy Secretary-General, Amina Mohammed, today (11 Jul) told the Security Council that “climate change is inextricably linked to some of the most pressing security challenges of our time” and added that “it is no coincidence that the countries most vulnerable to climate change are often those most vulnerable to conflict and fragility.”

Mohammed was addressing a Security Council debate on “Understanding and Addressing Climate-Related Security Risks.”

She stressed that climate change is linked, not just to environmental issues, but also to food insecurity and conflicts as she saw first-hand during her trip to the Lake Chad Basin region.

The Minister of Water Resources of Iraq, Hassan Al- Janabi, told the Council “climate change and the depletion of water resources destroy the fertility of the soil and turn it into barren land,” forcing people “to migrate to other places, not necessarily less severe, but because of their inability to adapt, due to poverty and vulnerability; living on dwindling water resources or scattered and unpredicted rainfall.”

For his part, Russian representative Dmitry Polyanskiy took issue with the theme of the debate.

He said, “attempts to use the climate factor as an explanation for socioeconomic and political situations in given countries and regions ultimately draw the conclusion that climate change is jeopardizing security, and yet the champions of these ideas, as a general rule, don’t burden themselves with scientifically sound specific details nor clear explanations of the notion of security, conflict, threat, and stability as regards to climate issues.”

Also addressing the Council, the President of Nauru, Baron Waqa, said “climate change will be the defining issue of the next century and our preparation is long overdue.”

Speaking on behalf of the which is why the Pacific Small Island Developing States, Waqa called for the appointment of a Special Representative on Climate and Security, who “would fill a critical gap within the UN system, as well as provide the Council with information it needs to fulfill its existing mandate.”

Outside the Council, the Deputy Prime Minister of Sweden, Margot Wallström, who presided the meeting, said “this is now the first meeting in the Security Council since 2011 and the third ever on climate related security risks. And it’s clear that the Council also needs to catch up with the reality on the ground, and it’s time to move from the question of whether, if climate change is affecting security to how, and what needs to be done in response.”
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