BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA LANDSLIDES

11-Jul-2018 00:03:45
UNHCR’s landslide expert in Cox’s Bazar is working to mitigate the effects of the current monsoon season which is expected to put refugee settlements at risk of floods and landslides. UNHCR
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STORY: BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA LANDSLIDES
TRT: 03:45
SOURCE: UNCHR
RESTRICTION: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 30 JUNE 2018, KUTUPALONG REFUGEE SITE, BANGLADESH / FILE
SHOTLIST
30 JUNE 2018, KUTUPALONG REFUGEE SITE, BANGLADESH

1. Wide shot, pan to UNHCR Shelter Officer, Marina Drazba looking at the construction of a draining
2. Close up, Marina Drazba
3. Various shots, Marina walking
4. Wide shot, tilt down on a landslide risk area
5. Various shots, landslide risk areas
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR):
“They hired a geologist because they realized there was a landslide risk here and it’s not an area that they had any experts in.”
7. Various shots, Rohingya refugee children playing on a landslide risk area
8. Wide shot, Rohingya refugees
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR):
“The biggest challenge is making everybody aware that there’s an issue. The Rohingyas didn’t come from an area that had landslides. They came from a flat area. So it’s a problem that they were unaware of.”
10. Wide shot, a bridge over a stream
11. Various shots, Marina looking at work
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR):
“We had to teach them that water here is one of our biggest problems. How do we manage water? How do they manage water? So as an agency, and as a population, we had to work together to come to a common solution without giving them more problems.”
13. Close up, cracking soil
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR):
“Behind me, you can see where two things are happening. One: there’s water coming down the slope and it’s going directly in to the slope. And the other things that’s happening is, a block has pulled away, and it’s a large tension crack. And tension cracks are showing you that something is moving, so it’s moving away.”

FILE – UNHCR – 2017, BANGLADESH

15. Various shots, Rohigya refugees arriving to Bangladesh
16. Aerial shots, early settlements

30 JUNE 2018, KUTUPALONG REFUGEE SITE, BANGLADESH

17. SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR): “So one thing that we have learned from our past mistakes is drainage. Drainage is a massive issue. So, here in this planned settlement -while the previous settlement was unplanned- here we’re planning it. We have a whole drainage network coming in. So we have small drainage coming in to medium drainage, which then leads out to a larger outflow, which controls the water, which then controls the landslide problem. And it also controls erosion, because this land is prone to erosion. So we do a ‘lessons learned’ when things go wrong to then mitigate our own problems within the camp.”
18. Wide shot, the new, organised camp site
19. Various shots, draining constructions at the new site
20. Various shots, Rohigya man working
21. SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR):
“The people here really want to learn and they’re hungry for information. As soon as you tell them the stuff, they’re like, ‘oh, how do we do it. How do we do this? Tell us more. And it’s (with) the ‘tell us more’ bit that you know you’re in – and the buy-in is fantastic.”
22. Wide shot, Marina walking across the construction site
23. Med shot, Rohigya refugees carrying construction materials
STORYLINE
The current monsoon season is expected to bring floods and landslides in the areas where hundreds of thousands of Rohingya are staying in Cox’s Bazar district – one of the wettest areas of the country.

UNHCR’s landslide expert is working to mitigate the effects of the current monsoon season on the refugee settlements in the area.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR):
“They hired a geologist because they realized there was a landslide risk here and it’s not an area that they had any experts in.”

Since August last year, more than 700,000 Rohingya refugees fled violence in Myanmar to Bangladesh, making it the world’s fastest growing refugee emergency in 2017. The total Rohingya refugee population in Cox’s Bazar district, south east Bangladesh is now over 900,000.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR):
“The biggest challenge is making everybody aware that there’s an issue. The Rohingyas didn’t come from an area that had landslides. They came from a flat area. So it’s a problem that they were unaware of.”

Humanitarian partners estimate that around 200,000 Rohingya refugees will be at risk this monsoon season. They are living on land prone to landslides and flooding and are in urgent need of relocation. Of this number, 42,000 people are at high risk due to severe instability of the land on which their shelters have been constructed.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR):
“We had to teach them that water here is one of our biggest problems. How do we manage water? How do they manage water? So as an agency, and as a population, we had to work together to come to a common solution without giving them more problems.”

A current priority is on the preparedness and response efforts to the monsoon and cyclone season, including through preparedness measures to mitigate the effects of the weather conditions on refugees.

SOUNDBITE (English) Marina Drazba, Shelter Officer, United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR):
“So one thing that we have learned from our past mistakes is drainage. Drainage is a massive issue. So, here in this planned settlement -while the previous settlement was unplanned- here we’re planning it. We have a whole drainage network coming in. So we have small drainage coming in to medium drainage, which then leads out to a larger outflow, which controls the water, which then controls the landslide problem. And it also controls erosion, because this land is prone to erosion. So we do a ‘lessons learned’ when things go wrong to then mitigate our own problems within the camp.”

UNHCR has been responding to the needs of Rohingya refugees and has boosted its presence through the deployment of relief specialists in different sectors.
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