BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA NEW ARRIVALS

30-Jun-2018 00:03:13
Fleeing violence and prosecution, Rohingya families continue to cross from Myanmar to Bangladeh seeking shelter in one of the camps that now host over 900,000 Rohingya refugees, while the United Nations humanitarians are facing increasing difficulties in providing them with sufficient assistance. UNHCR
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STORY: BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA NEW ARRIVALS
TRT: 3:13
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /ROHINGYA /NATS

DATELINE: 28 JUNE 2018, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, families taking their belongings to tents
2. Med shot, little girl in camp
3. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Moyjuna Begum, Rohingya refugee:
“I’ve just arrived here and need to get a refugee registration card. Then I’ll go see my relatives to find out about my daughter, and I’ll bring her home.”
4. Med shot, girl looking from tent
5. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Moyjuna Begum, Rohingya refugee:
“We couldn’t go to the market to shop. And when people saw us, we were robbed, then kicked and beaten. After that they would let us go. We couldn’t stay, we couldn’t eat. That’s why we came to you here.”
6. Close up, child getting haircut
7. Wide shot, father giving his son a haircut
8. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Jomila Putuni, Rohingya refugee:
“The shooting started in Pook Para, next to Maungdaw. Our daughter was headed to the market, but she got lost.”
9. Various shots, woman washing clothes in camp
10. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Jomila Putuni, Rohingya refugee:
“She’s lost. Where she’s gone or whether someone took her, I really don’t know. I don’t know whether she’s been killed. She’s 7 years old.”
11. Wide shot, women and children in camp
12. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Jomila Putuni, Rohingya refugee:
“When they took our livestock, we couldn’t say anything to them. When we went to the market, they would take it and beat us. We didn’t have enough to eat. That’s why we came here.”
13. Zoom in, pregnant woman entering Primary Health Center
14. Wide shot, women waiting inside center
15. Various shots, Akter examining a patient
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Tania Akter, midwife, Center supervisor:
“They are the vulnerable people. They need some extra care. So that’s why we provide a total sexual and reproductive health towards them. We provide here – midwives provide here - antenatal care - antenatal, postnatal care. And if in any emergency occurs, like post-partum hemorrhage or eclampsia or any other things, then we firstly stabilize here in our facility, then we refer the mother to a higher facility for better treatment.
17. Pan right, overcrowded hospital
18. Close up, mother holding baby
19. Close up, woman checking IV drip
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Sailesh Rajbanshi,obstetrics-gynecology specialist, UNFPA
“We’re trying our best – this hospital, the government staff, the government doctors, as well as we – are trying our best so that we can give service to both the host community as well as the Rohingyas.”
21. Med shot, woman with baby in bed
22. Wide shot, hospital room
STORYLINE
Fleeing violence and prosecution, Rohingya families continue to cross from Myanmar to Bangladeh seeking shelter in one of the camps that now host over 900,000 Rohingya refugees.

After getting basic supplies at the UNHCR’s Transit Center inside the camp, newly arrived Rohingya families settle in designated tents.

Moyjuna Begum is mother of three from Waikkong. She fled her home after an attack on her village, and went first to to Maungdaw, where she and her family were aided by a wealthy man from their village. However, they could not return to their village as the military stopped anyone from entering the area. During the chaos of the attack on their village, they lost track of their 12-year-old daughter Mahmuda Abibi. When they heard, months later, that Mahmuda might be living in Bangladesh in Ukhiya (near Kutupalong) having travelled with former neighbors, they decided to try to come search for her.

SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Moyjuna Begum, Rohingya refugee:
“I’ve just arrived here and need to get a refugee registration card. Then I’ll go see my relatives to find out about my daughter, and I’ll bring her home.”

She has two other daughters, Shofaira and Rofika Bibi. It took the family four days to make it from Maungdaw to Bangladesh.

Jomila Putuni, a mother of two from Kuendong, near Busidan, in Myanmar. Her older daughter of seven was lost in the chaos after an attack on a neighboring village.

SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Jomila Putuni, Rohingya refugee:
“The shooting started in Pook Para, next to Maungdaw. Our daughter was headed to the market, but she got lost.”

After waiting as long as they could, the family had no choice but to flee to Bangladesh.

SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Moyjuna Begum, Rohingya refugee:
“We couldn’t go to the market to shop. And when people saw us, we were robbed, then kicked and beaten. After that they would let us go. We couldn’t stay, we couldn’t eat. That’s why we came to you here.”

To help refugee women with critically needed care, the United Nations Population Fynd (UNFPA) and the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) established a Primary Health Care Center in Kutuaplong extension site Some 50 women are seen each day for services ranging from antenatal care to births, as well as psychosocial support, clinical management of rape and family planning.

The center, built by UNHCR, groups multiple health services, but the UNFPA programme specializes in women’s sexual and reproductive health. A team of five full-time Bangladeshi midwives, supported by UNFPA and implementing partner RTMI, sees roughly 50 women per day. The building, created six months ago, has been strengthened to resist heavy monsoon rains.

Tania Akter, 24, is part of a first generation of graduates from the Bangladeshi government’s midwifery course, a three-year programme supported by UNFPA. The 24-year-old has been working for 1.5 years and is now the supervising midwife at the center.

SOUNDBITE (English) Tania Akter, midwife, Center supervisor:
“They are the vulnerable people. They need some extra care. So that’s why we provide a total sexual and reproductive health towards them. We provide here – midwives provide here - antenatal care - antenatal, postnatal care. And if in any emergency occurs, like post-partum hemorrhage or eclampsia or any other things, then we firstly stabilize here in our facility, then we refer the mother to a higher facility for better treatment.”

The “higher facility” for Rohingya refugees is the Sadar District Hospital which is overcrowded and underfunded; however, with support from UN agencies it has expanded maternal health services to the benefit of both Rohingya refugees and Bangladeshi women.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Sailesh Rajbanshi,obstetrics-gynecology specialist, UNFPA
“We’re trying our best – this hospital, the government staff, the government doctors, as well as we – are trying our best so that we can give service to both the host community as well as the Rohingyas.”

Sadar Hospital is a government-run site with 250 beds – though increased demand on its services means it now regularly has 350-400 inpatients at any given moment. Two UNFPA obstetricians have joined the team to provide additional capacity for sexual and reproductive health care for women from both the host community in the Cox’s Bazar district and Rohingya refugees. The refugees are referred from health care centers in the refugee areas when they have conditions too complex for those primary care units to manage, like certain pregnancy complications.
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