GENEVA / GUTERRES DISARMAMENT

24-May-2018 00:06:15
UN Secretary-General António Guterres said disarmament is “an essential tool to secure our world and our future” adding that the world today was “one mechanical, electronic or human error away from a catastrophe that could eradicate entire cities from the map.” UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / GUTERRES DISARMAMENT
TRT: 06:15
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 24 MAY 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
24 MAY 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Geneva University
2. Wide shot, entrance to university
3. Wide shot, audience
4. Med shot, videographer
5. Wide shot, auditorium
6. Wide shot, stage
7. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The disarmament agenda I am launching today goes beyond nuclear weapons and weapons of mass destruction. Disarmament concerns every country, and all weapons, from hand grenades to hydrogen bombs. Deadly weapons put us all at risk and leaders have a responsibility to minimize that risk.”
8. Wide shot, screen “Securing our common future – An Agenda for Disarmament”
9. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Disarmament -- including arms control, non-proliferation, prohibitions, restrictions, confidence-building and, where needed, elimination -- is an essential tool to secure our world and our future.”
10. Med shot, people in attendance
11. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Strategic dialogue between the nuclear-weapon states remains today limited. There are no bilateral negotiations underway between Russia and the United States for further nuclear arms reductions.
Governments are pouring resources into updating old weapons systems, developing new ones, and entering into what many see as a new arms race, based on quality rather than quantity. Some 15,000 nuclear weapons remain stockpiled around the world. Hundreds are ready to be launched within minutes. We are one mechanical, electronic or human error away from a catastrophe that could eradicate entire cities from the map.”
12. Med shot, person in attendance
13. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Human security, national security and global security are indivisible. When people fear for their lives, their communities, societies and countries are at increased risk. When people enjoy safety, so do their countries and the world. The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, adopted last year and central in the awarding of the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize, demonstrated strong international support for a permanent end to the threat posed by nuclear arms. And it was also a call to break the stalemate in nuclear disarmament negotiations.”
14. Med shot, people in attendance
15. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Since 2014, the fact-finding mission of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has examined 83 incidents involving the alleged use of chemical weapons in Syria. Investigators have said chemical weapons were used, or were more than likely to have been used, in 14 cases so far. Each use is a crime under international law. And their widespread use may also constitute a crime against humanity. The Security Council has failed to meet its responsibility to ensure accountability for these attacks. And I am working with the Members of the Security Council to build new leadership and unity, to restore shared ownership and respect for the global ban on chemical weapons.”
16. Med shot, people in attendance
17. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Military industries are producing ever-more weapons. The arms trade is seeking ever-expanding markets. Countries are building up massive stockpiles of conventional arms, especially in the most conflict-prone regions of the world. And we must counter these destabilizing trends.
18. Med shot, people in attendance
19. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“My initiative will have a strong basis also in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the world’s blueprint for peace and prosperity on a healthy planet. Excessive spending on weapons drains resources for sustainable development. It is incompatible with creating stable, inclusive societies, strong institutions, effective governance and democracy, and a culture of respect for human rights.”
20. Med shot, people in attendance
21. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Civilians continue to bear the brunt of the armed conflict. Beyond the appalling numbers of civilians killed and injured, conflicts are driving record numbers of people from their homes, often depriving them of food, healthcare, education and any means of making a living. At the end of 2016, more than 65 million people were uprooted by war, violence and persecution. As armed conflict has moved from open fields into cities, explosive weapons are particularly deadly for civilians.”
22. Med shot, people in attendance
23. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The combined risks of new weapon technologies could have a game-changing impact on our future security. Our joint disarmament efforts in this area must have a game-changing preventive impact.
There are many things we can do together. Governments can improve oversight, transparency and accountability. All States have a responsibility to determine whether new weapons they seek would be prohibited under international law.”
24. Med shot, people in attendance
25. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The United Nations was created with the goal of eliminating war as an instrument of foreign policy. But seven decades on, our world is as dangerous as it has ever been. Disarmament prevents and ends violence. Disarmament supports sustainable development. And disarmament is true to our values and principles. This is why I am presenting this Agenda for Disarmament here today.”
26. Various shots, people in attendance
27. Med shot, photographers
STORYLINE
UN Secretary-General António Guterres launched today (24 May) his Disarmament Agenda called “Securing our Common Future” in a major policy address at the Université de Genève (Switzerland). He said, “The disarmament agenda I am launching today goes beyond nuclear weapons and weapons of mass destruction. Disarmament concerns every country, and all weapons, from hand grenades to H-bombs. Deadly weapons put us all at risk and leaders have a responsibility to minimize that risk."

Antonio Guterres added that “disarmament -- including arms control, non-proliferation, prohibitions, restrictions, confidence-building and, where needed, elimination -- is an essential tool to secure our world and our future”.

The new Disarmament Agenda focuses on three priorities: first, to save humanity through reduction and elimination of weapons of mass destruction, second to save lives by reducing the impact of conventional weapons and third to consider new battlefield technologies.

Motivated by the deteriorating international security environment, including a return to Cold War tensions, the Secretary-General said “human security, national security and global security are indivisible; when people fear for their lives, their communities, societies and countries are at increased risk. When people enjoy safety, so do their countries and the world. The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, adopted last year and central in the awarding of the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize, demonstrated strong international support for a permanent end to the threat posed by nuclear arms. And it was also a call to break the stalemate in nuclear disarmament negotiations”.

Guterrres noted that disarmament of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons could “save humanity”, adding that some 15,000 nuclear weapons remain stockpiled around the world. Hundreds are ready to be launched within minutes. “We are one mechanical, electronic or human error away from a catastrophe that could eradicate entire cities from the map”, the UN Secretary-General said.

He reminded that internal armed conflicts have devastating impacts on civilians. “Civilians continue to bear the brunt of armed conflict. Beyond the appalling numbers of civilians killed and injured, conflicts are driving record numbers of people from their homes, often depriving them of food, healthcare, education and any means of making a living. At the end of 2016, more than 65 million people were uprooted by war, violence and persecution. As armed conflict has moved from open fields into cities, explosive weapons are particularly deadly for civilians”.

In his address, the Secretary-General emphasized to re-establish disarmament as an integral component of the peace and security agenda of the United Nations. He said that “since 2014, the fact-finding mission of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has examined 83 incidents involving the alleged use of chemical weapons in Syria. Investigators have said chemical weapons were used, or were more than likely to have been used, in 14 cases so far. Each use is a crime under international law and their widespread use may also constitute a crime against humanity. The Security Council has failed to meet its responsibility to ensure accountability for these attacks and I am working with the Members of the Security Council to build new leadership and unity to restore shared ownership and respect for the global ban on chemical weapons”.

Regarding his second priority, the disarmament of conventional weapons that could save lives, more than USD 1.7 trillion dollars was spent last year on arms and armies – the highest level since the fall of the Berlin Wall. That is around 80 times the amount needed for global humanitarian aid. The UN chief said that “military industries are producing ever-more weapons. The arms trade is seeking ever-expanding markets. Countries are building up massive stockpiles of conventional arms, especially in the most conflict-prone regions of the world and we must counter these destabilizing trends”.

Antonio Guterres added that “civilians continue to bear the brunt of armed conflict. Beyond the appalling numbers of civilians killed and injured, conflicts are driving record numbers of people from their homes, often depriving them of food, healthcare, education and any means of making a living. At the end of 2016, more than 65 million people were uprooted by war, violence and persecution. As armed conflict has moved from open fields into cities, explosive weapons are particularly deadly for civilians”.

United Nations peacekeepers work on disarmament programmes around the world. They are an integral part of the UN’s work on sustaining peace. The UN chief said that “my initiative will have a strong basis also with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the world’s blueprint for peace and prosperity on a healthy planet. Excessive spending on weapons drains resources for sustainable development. It is incompatible with creating stable, inclusive societies, strong institutions, effective governance and democracy, and a culture of respect for human rights”.

The Secretary-General's third priority - disarmament for future generations - offers new perspectives for advancing disarmament. “The combined risks of new weapon technologies could have a game-changing impact on our future security. Our joint disarmament efforts in this area must have a game-changing preventive impact. There are many things we can do together. Governments can improve oversight, transparency and accountability. All States have a responsibility to determine whether new weapons they seek would be prohibited under international law.”

Antonio Guterres concluded his address by saying that “the United Nations was created with the goal of eliminating war as an instrument of foreign policy. But seven decades on, our world is as dangerous as it has ever been. Disarmament prevents and ends violence. Disarmament supports sustainable development. And disarmament is true to our values and principles. This is why I am presenting this Agenda for Disarmament here today."
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