UN / ANTI CORRUPTION

23-May-2018 00:02:22
UN Secretary-General António Guterres said corruption affects “developed and developing countries alike” and called on global leaders to take “a moral stand and install a culture of integrity from the top down.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / ANTI CORRUPTION
TRT: 2:22
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 23 MAY 2018, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

23 MAY 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Corruption affects developed and developing countries alike, and complicity knows no borders. Those who can least afford corruption suffer the most. It cripples economic development, stifles entrepreneurship and deters foreign investment. Society cannot function equitably and efficiently when public officials – from doctors to police, judges and politicians – enrich themselves rather than perform their duties with integrity.”
4. Wide shot, delegates
5. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“If governments are serious about doing the best for their citizens, then pledges to promote integrity and clamp down on corruption must be more than campaign promises and words on paper. Millions will go to the polls this year with corruption high on their agenda. I make an urgent call to our global leadership to take a moral stand and install a culture of integrity from the top down. It all begins with setting an example. By tackling corruption, governments can show they mean business.”
6. Wide shot, dais
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Yury Fedotov, Executive Director, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
“Nowadays, it is hard to imagine just 15 years ago, historically a very short period of time, there was no global instrument to criminalise corruption to fight briberies, to recover and return stolen assets. Now, nearly every country in the world has corruption offenses in their books. They cooperate and provide mutual legal assistance.”
8. Wides shot, delegates
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Yury Fedotov, Executive Director, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
“Last year, Switzerland returned 3.5 million euros to Tunisa. In December, Switzerland signed an agreement with the Nigerian Government to return 321 million dollars. Just two examples that represent only a small fraction of the funds lost to corruption. Money that could be used to build roads and hospitals, schools that teach children and enable opportunities. These achievements of the convention represent the solid progress on which we can and must build.”
10. Wide shot, Trusteeship Council
STORYLINE
UN Secretary-General António Guterres said corruption affects “developed and developing countries alike” and called on global leaders to take “a moral stand and install a culture of integrity from the top down.”

Speaking today (23 May) at an event marking the 15th anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Convention Against Corruption, Guterres said corruption cripples economic development and societies “cannot function equitably and efficiently when public officials – from doctors to police, judges and politicians – enrich themselves rather than perform their duties with integrity." He added that it creates a sense of desperation and fuels the large movements of people seeking better prospects.

Guterres stressed the need to eradicate corruption at all levels and restore trust where it has been lost, emphasizing the importance of civil society, a free press, and young people, in bringing to light corrupt practices and holding individuals, businesses and governments to account.

The Secretary-General said, “If governments are serious about doing the best for their citizens, then pledges to promote integrity and clamp down on corruption must be more than campaign promises and words on paper.”

The head of the UN Office on Drugs And Crime (UNODC) Yury Fedotov said it was “hard to imagine just 15 years ago, historically a very short period of time, there was no global instrument to criminalise corruption, to fight briberies, to recover and return stolen assets; now, nearly every country in the world has corruption offenses in their books; they cooperate and provide mutual legal assistance.”

Fedotov said the UN Convention Against Corruption was an essential compliment to other crime related conventions including on organized crime, drugs, and counter terrorism among others. He stressed that the effective implementation of the convention could support achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as anti-corruption efforts are crucial to sustaining healthcare, water, education, and other vital services while protecting the environment and reducing inequalities.

The UNODC chief said international cooperation supported the implementation of the Convention and allowed for assets lost to corruption to be recovered. He said the recovered money “could be used to build roads and hospitals, schools that teach children and enable opportunities.”
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