LIBYA / HEALTH CARE HUMAN RIGHTS

23-May-2018 00:01:00
The ongoing violence in Libya is crumbling the health care system. Direct targeting of health workers and patients in the conflict could constitute war crimes, a United Nations joint report has said. OHCHR /UNSMIL
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STORY: LIBYA / HEALTH SYSTEM HUMAN RIGHTS
TRT: 1:00
SOURCE: OHCHR /UNSMIL
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 17 MAY 2018 TRIPOLI, LIBYA-18 MAY 2018, TUNIS, / FILE
SHOTLIST
1. Aerial shot, Tripoli Libya
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Matilda Bogner, Head of the Human Rights, Transitional Justice and Rule of Law Division of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“The violence in Libya has had a significant impact on the provision of health care across the country.”
3. Tracking shot, street in Tripoli
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Matilda Bogner, Head of the Human Rights, Transitional Justice and Rule of Law Division of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“We have documented healthcare workers being targeted as well as patients and they have been assaulted, intimidated, threatened and injured – usually by mem-bers of armed groups during attacks on medical facilities.”
5. Wide shot, destruction
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Matilda Bogner, Head of the Human Rights, Transitional Justice and Rule of Law Division of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“The direct attacks on medical facilities and personnel are prohibited. And hostage taking and killing of the wounded and sick are very serious crimes and may constitute a war crime.”
7. Med shot Libyan flags
STORYLINE
The ongoing violence in Libya is crumbling the health care system. Direct targeting of health workers and patients in the conflict could constitute war crimes, a United Nations joint report has said

The UN Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) and the UN Human Rights Office (Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights – OHCHR) in a report have documented the “devastating impact” of the violence on the delivery of health-care.

Matilda Bogner, the Head of the UN Human Rights Office in Libya, based in Tunisia, said “The violence in Libya has had a significant impact on the provision of health care across the country,” adding in “we have documented healthcare workers being targeted as well as patients and they have been assaulted, intimidated, threatened and injured – usually by members of armed groups during attacks on medical facilities.”

Citing international law, Bogner added: “The direct attacks on medical facilities and personnel are prohibited. And hostage taking and killing of the wounded and sick are very serious crimes and may constitute a war crime.”

The UN Human Rights office also called for all parties to the conflict to adhere to interna-tional humanitarian law and stop the attacks.

The report covers a year of attacks on medical facilities and medical personnel as well as patients – from 1st May 2017 to 1 May 2018. The methodology used to document the vio-lations was through interviews with a range of stakeholders. These included, hospital staff, patients, witnesses, humanitarian workers, human rights defenders and journalists, among others.

Following six months of armed conflict in Libya in 2011, the UN established UNSMIL, a political mission, to support the country’s transitional authorities in their post-conflict ef-forts.
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