UN / MIGRATION GLOBAL COMPACT

21-May-2018 00:02:20
The Special Representative for International Migration, Louise Arbour said “recognizing the fact that migration is highly time-bounding and context specific, the Global Compact should allow for sufficient flexibility to calibrate policies to continuously evolving context and reality.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / MIGRATION GLOBAL COMPACT
TRT: 02:20
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 21 MAY 2018, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Exterior, United Nations Headquarters

21 MAY 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative for International Migration:
“Recognizing the fact that migration is highly time-bounding and context specific, the Global Compact should allow for sufficient flexibility to calibrate policies to continuously evolving context and reality.”
4. Wide shot, conference room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative for International Migration:
“Many migrant workers, particularly those employed in the lower skilled sector, faced discrimination and exploitative working conditions. Despite most empirical evidence suggesting otherwise, migrant workers are often assumed to have an adverse impact on wages and living standards of native workers.”
6. Med shot, President of the General Assembly
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative for International Migration:
“Government, regulators and financial services providers must also address the long-standing need to reduce the cost migrants incur in transferring remittances to their countries of origin, and in particular they must ensure that banking regulations aim at preventing international money laundering and the financing of terrorism do not provide barriers for migrants to send remittances home to their families.”
8. Wide shot, conference room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative for International Migration:
“Tailor made in context specific solutions are required. The best policies may not prove applicable or necessary in a given context, yet the Compact should provide the compendium of desirable initiatives, anchored in human rights in responsive to the interest and the circumstances of all concerned, States of origin, transit, destination, neighboring States, migrants themselves of course, as well as their families and their employers.”
10. Wide shot, conference room
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative for International Migration:
“We have seen Member States and stakeholders in many parts of the world responding with great solidarity and compassion, accommodating new arrivals under temporary protection schemes where they do not qualify for refugee protections, particularly those who were affected by natural disasters and the adverse effect of climate change.”
12. Wide shot, conference room
STORYLINE
The Special Representative for International Migration, Louise Arbour said “recognizing the fact that migration is highly time-bounding and context specific, the Global Compact should allow for sufficient flexibility to calibrate policies to continuously evolving context and reality.”

Speaking at an intergovernmental conference titled “Migration – What’s Really Going On: Lessons from the Field” today (21 May) in New York, the Special Representative reiterated the challenges migrants are facing.

She said “many migrant workers, particularly those employed in the lower skilled sector, faced discrimination and exploitative working conditions. Despite most empirical evidence suggesting otherwise, migrant workers are often assumed to have an adverse impact on wages and living standards of native workers.”

Arbour also noted that while migrant workers contribute to the tax and social welfare system in countries of destination, many of them find it impossible to enjoy the earned benefit of these contributions.

On policymaking, the Special Representative said “government, regulators and financial services providers must also address the long-standing need to reduce the cost migrants incur in transferring remittances to their countries of origin.”

She added “in particular they must ensure that banking regulations aim at preventing international money laundering and the financing of terrorism do not provide barriers for migrants to send remittances home to their families.”

On irregular migration and the situations of irregular migrants, Arbour said “tailor made in context specific solutions are required. The best policies may not prove applicable or necessary in a given context, yet the Compact should provide the compendium of desirable initiatives, anchored in human rights in responsive to the interest, to the circumstances of all concerned, States of origin, transit, destination, neighboring States, migrants themselves, of course as well as their families and their employers.”

On the progress made, she said “we have seen Member States and stakeholders in many parts of the world responding with great solidarity and compassion, accommodating new arrivals under temporary protection schemes where they do not qualify for refugee protections, particularly those who were affected by natural disasters and the adverse effect of climate change.”

“Migration – What’s Really Going On: Lessons from the Field” is the fifth informal interactive multi-stakeholder hearing. The discussion focused on carrying out activities that will result in safer, more orderly and regular migration.

In December this year, the Intergovernmental Conference to Adopt the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration will be held in Morocco.
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