SOUTH SUDAN / LOWCOCK DAY TWO

16-May-2018 00:03:09
On the final day of his visit to South Sudan, the UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Mark Lowcock, met with opposition leaders as well as Government representatives and those most affected by the conflict, many of whom have fled their homes and are relying on humanitarian aid for survival. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / LOWCOCK DAY TWO
TRT: 3:09
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 16 MAY 2018, YEI /MUNDU /JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
DATELINE: 16 MAY 2018, MUNDU, SOUTH SUDAN

1. Aerial shot, Mundu
2. Wide shot, Lowcock getting off the chopper and meeting I/O representatives
3. Pan right, protestors with posters
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Lujo Joseph, acting SPLA-I/O Governor:
“We want the peace negotiations to put the interests of the people of South Sudan first and when they become the centre of negotiations, I think we will definitely see peace in the country.”
5. Med shot, I/O acting governor speaking

16 MAY 2018, YEI, SOUTH SUDAN

6. Med shot, Lowcock and SPLM Governor
7. Tilt up, IDP children
8. Med shot, IDP woman on wheelchair

16 MAY 2018, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs & Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“The suffering of ordinary people is unimaginable. The peace process so far has produced nothing. The cessation of hostilities is a fiction. The economy has collapsed. Belligerents use scorched-earth tactics, murder and rape as weapons of war. These are all gross violations of international law. Seven million people now need humanitarian assistance and things are simply getting worse.”
10. Various shots, press conference
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs & Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“The aid agencies are subject to harassment, extortion, looting, kidnappings, killings, predatory fees and levies and other blockages all over the country. And those things have a direct effect, reducing our ability to help people who need humanitarian assistance. South Sudan is one of the world’s most dangerous places to be an aid worker and I want to pay tribute to their bravery. They take huge risks every day to deliver assistance. In the last two months alone, four aid workers have been killed, and that takes the total killed since the conflict began to more than 100. Most of them are the citizens of South Sudan.”

16 MAY 2018, YEI, SOUTH SUDAN

12. Tracking shot, convoy
13. Tracking shot, convoy
14. Wide shot, IDPs dancing
15. Med shot, young girl dancing with child on her back

16 MAY 2018, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs & Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Ending the violence is the first and single-most important thing that is needed to alleviate the humanitarian suffering in this country. But, not only has the violence increased, but humanitarian agencies are increasingly impeded from saving lives by restrictions of the operating environment. And what we need is rapid, safe, unhindered access to all people in need.”

16 MAY 2018, YEI, SOUTH SUDAN

17. Close up, Lowcock with IDPS in the background
18. Med shot, under-tree meeting IDP area
19. Tracking shot, convoy
STORYLINE
On the final day of his visit to South Sudan, the UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Mark Lowcock, met with opposition leaders as well as Government representatives and those most affected by the conflict, many of whom have fled their homes and are relying on humanitarian aid for survival.

In opposition-held territory in central Equatoria, Lowcock met with opposition leaders.

SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Lujo Joseph, acting SPLA-I/O Governor:
“We want the peace negotiations to put the interests of the people of South Sudan first and, when they become the centre of negotiations, I think we will definitely see peace in the country.”

In Yei, he met with the Government representatives.

Upon his return to the capital Juba, the Under-Secretary-General held a press conference where he said “the suffering of ordinary people is unimaginable. The peace process so far has produced nothing. The cessation of hostilities is a fiction. The economy has collapsed. Belligerents use scorched-earth tactics, murder and rape as weapons of war. All these are all gross violations of international law. Seven million people now need humanitarian assistance and things are simply getting worse.”

Lowcock described the problems faced by aid workers trying to provide assistance amidst escalating violence.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs & Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“The aid agencies are subject to harassment, extortion, looting, kidnappings, killings, predatory fees and levies and other blockages all over the country. And those things have a direct effect, reducing our ability to help people who need humanitarian assistance. South Sudan is one of the world’s most dangerous places to be an aid worker and I want to pay tribute to their bravery. They take huge risks every day to deliver assistance. In the last two months alone, four aid workers have been killed, and that takes the total killed since the conflict began to more than 100. Most of them are the citizens of South Sudan.”

Despite the challenges of operating in remote and dangerous locations, humanitarians are saving lives. Last year, agencies reached 5.4 million South Sudanese in need. However, the top United Nations humanitarian said that, without peace, the immense suffering will continue.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs & Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Ending the violence is the first and single-most important thing that is needed to alleviate the humanitarian suffering in this country. But, not only has the violence increased, but humanitarian agencies are increasingly impeded from saving lives by restrictions of the operating environment. And what we need is rapid, safe, unhindered access to all people in need.”

Lowcock said that crimes were being committed against humanitarians with impunity. While the UN and its partners remained fully committed to South Sudan, there needed to be greater accountability and protection for aid workers risking their own lives to save others.
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