UNICEF / IMMUNIZATION

24-Apr-2018 00:01:40
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) said that two-thirds of unvaccinated children live in fragile countries or those affected by conflict. Between 2010 and 2016, Syria saw the sharpest decline in vaccinated children, with coverage falling by 38 percentage points over this period. Second is Ukraine where coverage decreased by 33 percentage points. UNICEF
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STORY: UNICEF / IMMUNIZATION
TRT: 1:40
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTION: PLEASE CREDIT UNICEF ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: NATS

DATELINE: 21-23 FEBRUARY 2018, INDIA / 26 FEBRUARY TO 1 MARCH 2018, BALUKHALI CAMP HEALTH CENTER, BANGLEDASH / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – UNICEF -6 FEBRUARY 2014, MARABA, SYRIA

1. Med shot, aid worker immunizing children in their home

26 FEBRUARY - 1 MARCH 2018, BALUKHALI CAMP HEALTH CENTER, BANGLEDASH

2. Med shot, baby receiving oral vaccine
3. Med shot, baby getting injected vaccine
4. Med shot, baby getting injected vaccine

FILE – UNICEF - 19-21 FEBRUARY 2017, ALHAYAMAH, YEMEN

5. Close up, child being vaccinated
6. Med shot, health worker vaccinating child

FILE – UNICEF - 10-12 AUGUST 2016, MAIDUGURI, NIGERIA

7. Wide shot, families waiting outside UNICEF tent
8. Various shots, children being vaccinated

FILE – UNICEF - 24 APRIL 2017, BEERTA MUURI CAMPS, BAIDOA, SOMALIA

9. Wide shot, child being vaccinated
10. Med shot, child being vaccinated
11. Wide shot, child being vaccinated

21-23 February 2018, INDIA

12. Various shots, vaccine bottles on conveyor belt
STORYLINE
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) said that two-thirds of unvaccinated children live in fragile countries or those affected by conflict. Between 2010 and 2016, Syria saw the sharpest decline in vaccinated children, with coverage falling by 38 percentage points over this period. Second is Ukraine where coverage decreased by 33 percentage points.

UNICEF and its partners also said that if vaccination is not prioritized, some of the most marginalized children will miss out on their right to benefit from immunization, which could mean the difference between life and death.

Vaccines keep children alive and healthy by protecting them against disease.

Yet in 2016, an estimated 1.4 million children under five died from vaccine-preventable diseases.

Approximately one-fourth of deaths among children under 5 were from¬ pneumonia, diarrhoea and measles, and could have been mostly prevented by vaccines.

Globally one in seven children – over 19 million – missed out on routine vaccines, including 13 million who have never been vaccinated, putting them and their communities at risk of disease and death.

Low immunization coverage compromises gains in all other areas of health for mothers and children. The poorest, most vulnerable children who need immunization the most continue to be the least likely to get it.

Despite these challenges, vaccines are protecting more children than ever before. Behind their phenomenal success lies the hard work of health workers who go from village-to-village to vaccinate children, even though they encounter fear and suspicion.
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