SOUTH SUDAN / HOSPITAL PROJECT

23-Apr-2018 00:02:46
Thanks to a solar power project funded by the United Nations peacekeeping mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), doctors and nurses at the Teaching Hospital in the country’s capital Juba, can now assist those in need despite often powercut-offs. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / HOSPITAL PROJECT
TRT: 2:46
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /ARABIC /NATS

DATELINE: 23 APRIL, 2018, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, Juba teaching hospital
2. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Susan Soro, Nurse at Juba Teaching Hospital: “Sometimes we have cases of those who wanted to deliver (babies) but with the darkness it becomes difficult for a nurse to help, so giving birth without light sometimes results in deaths. But since there are people who think about us South Sudanese, may God bless them.”
3. Various shots, solar power installation
4. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hayat Khamis, Nurse at Juba Teaching Hospital:
“We were using our mobile phone light. Sometimes it falls on the patient. Even to insert the canal (for the drip) we used our mobile phone light. These were the most difficult moments for us but now we thank God that we have light, we can work.”
5. Various shots, solar power installation
6. SOUNDBITE (English): Dr Fredrick Khamis, Acting Director, Juba Teaching Hospital:
“Sometimes you need investigations to be conducted across different wards so the movement of our patients, doctors and nurses who are working in the hospital was in jeopardy because its dark sometimes and they are afraid and that impacts the treatment of our patients. Now the installation of these solar panels at Juba Teaching Hospital has lightened the path, people can walk at night, nobody is afraid and our doctors are actually happy to come across from our emergency department to the wards to see patients in case they develop problems.”
7. Various shots, nurses dancing
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Malick Ceesay, Acting Head of UNMISS Juba Field Office:
“You cannot have development without a healthy nation. A healthy nation that is promising its citizens a better future. So by providing this support at the Juba Teaching Hospital, we are enhancing or providing security and protection for the civilians that are coming here.”
9. Pan left shot, exterior of the hospital
STORYLINE
Thanks to a solar power project funded by the United Nations peacekeeping mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), doctors and nurses at the Teaching Hospital in the country’s capital Juba, can now assist those in need despite often powercut-offs.

The hospital staff were struggling to treat patients with constant power cuts forcing them to improvise in ways that sometimes risked the very lives they were trying to save.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Susan Soro, Nurse at Juba Teaching Hospital: “Sometimes we have cases of those who wanted to deliver (babies) but with the darkness it becomes difficult for a nurse to help, so giving birth without light sometimes results in deaths. But since there are people who think about us South Sudanese, may God bless them.”

Five years of fighting has left the world youngest nation infrastructure in appalling condition.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hayat Khamis, Nurse at Juba Teaching Hospital:
“We were using our mobile phone light. Sometimes it falls on the patient. Even to insert the canal (for the drip) we used our mobile phone light. These were the most difficult moments for us but now we thank God that we have light, we can work.”

The days of blackouts are now over thanks to a solar power project funded by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan. A total of 38 solar panels, plus batteries and metal poles have been erected in a bid to provide a safe working environment 24 hour a day.

SOUNDBITE (English): Dr Fredrick Khamis, Acting Director, Juba Teaching Hospital:
“Sometimes you need investigations to be conducted across different wards so the movement of our patients, doctors and nurses who are working in the hospital was in jeopardy because its dark sometimes and they are afraid and that impacts the treatment of our patients. Now the installation of these solar panels at Juba Teaching Hospital has lightened the path, people can walk at night, nobody is afraid and our doctors are actually happy to come across from our emergency department to the wards to see patients in case they develop problems.”

UNMISS intends to undertake other projects to support the hospital in future.

SOUNDBITE (English) Malick Ceesay, Acting Head of UNMISS Juba Field Office:
“You cannot have development without a healthy nation. A healthy nation that is promising its citizens a better future. So by providing this support at the Juba Teaching Hospital, we are enhancing or providing security and protection for the civilians that are coming here.”

The next step for the hospital is to improve hygiene, sanitation and mortuary services so that they can provide the best possible care to the people of South Sudan.
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