UN / INDIGENOUS HUMAN RIGHTS

19-Apr-2018 00:01:41
An indigenous human rights activist from Kenya told reporters today that her community is facing threats of violence and evictions from the Embobut forest in the country. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / INDIGENOUS HUMAN RIGHTS
TRT: 1:41
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 APRIL 2018, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Exterior, United Nations Headquarter

19 APRIL 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Milka Chepkorir Kuto, Human rights activist, Sengwer, Kenya:
“Being indigenous - I always say - is not a mistake, it’s not an accident. We were created and made indigenous, and we are living in the forest because our creator put us there.”
4. Wide shot, briefing room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Milka Chepkorir Kuto, Human rights activist, Sengwer, Kenya:
“If these international bodies can for a minute just stop and think through what their money is doing, then we’ll be safe as indigenous communities in Kenya.”
6. Wide shot, briefing room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Rani Yan Yan, Advisor to the Chakma Circle Chief, Bangladesh:
“Because the media has been suppressed and the media has been controlled by the government, the government can sensitize public opinion and can legitimize their acts of oppression to us, the indigenous people.”
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rani Yan Yan, Advisor to the Chakma Circle Chief, Bangladesh:
“They believe we are acting as traitors to the country. That’s an act of treason against state. And even if we are organized politically, like members of the regional political groups, they are being accused of not respecting the sovereignty of the state. And this is the common language that most of the governments use when they want to criminalize indigenous people.”
9. Wide shot, press briefing room
STORYLINE
An indigenous human rights activist from Kenya told reporters today (19 Apr) that her community is facing threats of violence and evictions from the Embobut forest in the country.

Milka Chepkorir Kuto is a member of the Sengwer indigenous people. Her community lives in the Embobut forest in the western highlands of Kenya.

She said “being indigenous is not a mistake, it’s not an accident. We were created and made indigenous, and we are living in the forest because our creator put us there.”

On funding from donors and organisations that are affecting her community, Kuto said “if these international bodies can for a minute just stop and think through what their money is doing, then we’ll be safe as indigenous communities in Kenya.”

Rani Yan Yan, an advisor to the Chakma Circle Chief from Bangladesh said “because of the media has been suppressed and the media has been controlled by the government, the government can sensitize public opinion and can legitimize their acts of oppression to us, the indigenous people.”

Yan defended two sisters belonging to the minority Marma community in Bangladesh who were reportedly raped by security enforcement officers in the country.

On the government’s reaction to the case, Yan said “they believe we are acting as traitors to the country. That’s an act of treason against state. And even if we are organized politically, like members of the regional political groups, they are being accused of not respecting the sovereignty of the state.”

She added “this is the common language that most of the governments use when they want to criminalize indigenous people.”

The UN kicked off its annual permanent forum on indigenous issues in its New York Headquarters this week. The theme for this year is “Indigenous peoples’ collective rights to lands, territories and resources.”

Established in 2000, the forum provides expert advice and recommendations on indigenous issues to the UN’s Economic and Social Council as well as to specialized agencies that work on issues like development, agriculture, environmental protection and human rights.
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