FAO / FOOD CRISES REPORT PRESSER

22-Mar-2018 00:03:01
Launching a new report, Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) today warned that food crises continue to strike, and acute hunger intensifies due to conflict and climate change. FAO
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STORY: FAO / FOOD CRISES REPORT PRESSER
TRT: 03:01
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 22 MARCH 2018, ROME, ITALY
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, speakers at press conference
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Director-General José Graziano da Silva, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“We have seen that in those countries under conflict, there are two main drivers that push for increased numbers of people severely affected: as mentioned, climate change and by far drought in Africa is the main issue. We have seen when El Niño affects the countries, it’s the worst combination: the conflict and the drought. And also the political issues. Even in those countries we cannot have conditions to be on the ground where we need to be to attend the people affected. So these two fronts need to be addressed
3. Med shot, audience
4. SOUNDBITE (English) José Graziano da Silva, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“The message with which I want to close is that to save lives we need to save the livelihoods of the people where people are, because most of these people still rely on agriculture, fisheries, livestock for their survival.”
5. Wide shot, conference
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Neven Mimica, Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development, European Union:
“Our collective action should also be based on the different competencies and mandate of each actor in the specific situation. Certainly we should address security, development and humanitarian issues in a more coordinated manner. We need to recognize the complexity of crisis scenarios and the increasing unmet needs, not only when providing short-term humanitarian relief but also in tackling long term root causes and resilience.”
7. Wide shot, conference room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) David Beasley, Executive Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“Because ISIS and Boko Harm and Al-Shabaab and Al Qaeda and extremist group, they have one agenda and that is to infiltrate, destabilise and migrate to create economic destabilization around the world. And the answer is not just feeding people, the answer is resilience and sustainable development because these moms and dads out there, if they have food for their children and they have livelihood they will not be prone to this recruitment method where extremists used weapon as recruitment, weapons as division and weapons as war. And those of us in this room wants to see food to be used as a weapon of peace of reconciliation.”
9. Wide shot, conference room
STORYLINE
Launching a new report, Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) today warned that food crises continue to strike, and acute hunger intensifies due to conflict and climate change.

The latest Global Report on Food Crises sounds the alarm that some 124 million people in 51 countries were affected by acute food insecurity during 2017 — 11 million more people than the year before.

The report defines acute food insecurity as hunger so severe that it poses an immediate threat to lives or livelihoods.

SOUNDBITE (English) Director-General José Graziano da Silva, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“We have seen that in those countries under conflict, there are two main drivers that push for increased numbers of people severely affected: as mentioned, climate change and by far drought in Africa is the main issue. We have seen when El Niño affects the countries, it’s the worst combination: the conflict and the drought. And also the political issues. Even in those countries we cannot have conditions to be on the ground where we need to be to attend the people affected. So these two fronts need to be addressed.”

The increase is largely attributable to new or intensified conflict and insecurity in Myanmar, north-east Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan and Yemen. Prolonged drought conditions also resulted in consecutive poor harvests in countries already facing high levels of food insecurity and malnutrition in eastern and southern Africa.

SOUNDBITE (English) José Graziano da Silva, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“The message with which I want to close is that to save lives we need to save the livelihoods of the people where people are, because most of these people still rely on agriculture, fisheries, livestock for their survival.”

Produced each year by a group of international humanitarian partners, the report was presented by the European Union, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) at a briefing for UN member nations in Rome.

SOUNDBITE (English) Neven Mimica, Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development, European Union:
“Our collective action should also be based on the different competencies and mandate of each actor in the specific situation. Certainly we should address security, development and humanitarian issues in a more coordinated manner. We need to recognize the complexity of crisis scenarios and the increasing unmet needs, not only when providing short-term humanitarian relief but also in tackling long term courses and resilience.”

SOUNDBITE (English) David Beasley, Executive Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“Because ISIS and Boko Harm and Al-Shabaab and Al Qaeda and extremist group, they have one agenda and that is to infiltrate, destabilise and migrate to create economic destabilization around the world. And the answer is not just feeding people, the answer is resilience and sustainable developmenT because these moms and dads out there, if they have food for their children and they have livelihood they will not be prone to this recruitment method where extremists used weapon as recruitment, weapons as division and weapons as war. And those of us in this room wants to see food to be used as a weapon of peace of reconciliation.”

The situation revealed by the Global Report highlights the urgent need for simultaneous action to save lives, livelihoods and to address the root causes of food crises.

The Global Report on Food Crises brings together regional and national data and analysis from multiple sources into one document to provide a clear comprehensive picture of food crises and acute food insecurity in affected countries.

By providing evidence-based analysis, the report demonstrates that as well as critically needed humanitarian aid, development action needs to engage much earlier so as to tackle the root causes of extreme vulnerability, therefore building resilience.
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