UN / WATER CRISIS REPORT

14-Mar-2018 00:01:14
The United Nations (UN) Secretary-General today received a new report on the current global water crisis from the High-Level Panel on water, which consists of eleven Heads of State and a Special Advisor. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / WATER CRISIS REPORT
TRT: 01:14
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 14 MARCH 2018, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

14 MARCH 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Various shots, Secretary-General receiving report from the High-Level Panel on water
3. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“It is my deep belief that water is a matter of life and death. 60 per cent of our body is water, two billion people in the world have no access to safe water and 4.5 billion to proper sanitation which means we are facing an enormous challenge. On the other hand, climate change is still running faster than what we are, and the implications of that from the point of view of the water system is huge. And if we look at natural disasters, the natural disasters that have water included are multiplying and becoming more and more dangerous everywhere, which means water is indeed a matter of life and death. It must be an absolute priority in everything we do.”
4. Wide shot, Guterres having meeting with the panel
STORYLINE
The United Nations (UN) Secretary-General today received a new report on the current global water crisis from the High-Level Panel on water, which consists of 11 Heads of State and a Special Advisor.

The Secretary-General António Guterres said that it is his “deep belief that water is a matter of life and death."

He reiterated that water “must be an absolute priority in everything we do.”

He said “60 per cent of our body is water, two billion people in the world have no access to safe water and 4.5 billion to proper sanitation which means we are facing an enormous challenge, adding that “climate change is still running faster than what we are, and the implications of that from the point of view of the water system is huge. And if we look at natural disasters, the natural disasters that have water included are multiplying and becoming more and more dangerous everywhere.”

The report “Making Every Drop Count: An Agenda for Water Action” calls for a fundamental shift in the way the world manages water so that the Sustainable Development Goals can be achieved.

It sets forth a new approach to catalyze change and build partnerships and cooperation, outlining why an integrated and inclusive approach that draws in sectors like agriculture, and other stakeholders, such as city mayors, is needed. The report makes the case that ways of working between, for example, governments, communities, the private sector and researchers, are essential.

The report found that the water crisis has many dimensions. Today, 40 percent of the world’s people are affected by water scarcity, with as many as 700 million people at risk of being displaced by intense water scarcity by 2030. More than two billion people are compelled to drink unsafe water and more than 4.5 billion people do not have safely managed sanitation services.

Women and girls suffer disproportionately when water and sanitation are lacking, affecting health and often restricting work and education opportunities. 80 percent of wastewater is discharged untreated into the environment and water-related disasters account for 90 percent of the 1,000 most devastating natural disasters since 1990.
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