UN / SEXUAL VIOLENCE CONFLICT

09-Mar-2018 00:02:44
The Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Pramila Patten, spoke to journalists in New York about the findings from her recent trips to Iraq and Darfur. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / CHILDREN ARMED CONFLICT
TRT: 02:38
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 06 MARCH 2018, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Close up, UN flag outside exterior United Nations headquarters

06 MARCH 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, dais
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict:
“There remain serious concerns regarding conflict related sexual violence in Darfur. During my brief visit to both camps I learned that the women and girls are especially at risk of sexual violence when they step out of the camps, especially to pursue their livelihood activities. In El Geneina I heard from women who are unable to return to their pre-war homes do to security concerns and fear of being raped. In addition, some women told me about sexual violence committed in the context of inter-communal conflicts over land and resources.”
4. Med shot, journalists
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict:
“There are some encouraging amendments brought recently to the criminal code, such as in the definition of rape, as well as on the establishment of women and child protection police units. These are positive steps forward. At the same time, I note that there are no female judges in any of the five states of Darfur, and I expressed the need for female judges as well as more female police investigators and prosecutors.”
6. Med shot, journalists
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict:
“Many of the women who remain displaced expressed serious safety concerns regarding their return to their homes due to activity from different militia groups and the reported presence of former Daesh combatants within their community. Sunni women in particular shared their fear of reprisals on account of the wrong perception of affiliation with Daesh. The situation of survivors returning with children is extremely disturbing. While some religious leaders may show some empathy, the tribal leaders display a profound reluctance to accept children born of rape.”
8. Med shot, journalists
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in
Conflict:
“I urged the government to ensure that women and girls who are victims of Daesh are not wrongfully perceived as being affiliates, associates, or intelligence assets, and I urged the government to ensure that all survivors of conflict related sexual violence are fully protected and that perpetrators are brought to justice.”
10. Wide shot, end of briefing
STORYLINE
The Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Pramila Patten, today (09 Mar) spoke to journalists in New York about the findings from her recent trips to Iraq and the Sudanese region of Darfur.

Patten said that “there remain serious concerns regarding conflict related sexual violence in Darfur” and explained that during her visit to camps in El Geneina and El Fasher she learned that “women and girls are especially at risk of sexual violence when they step out of the camps, especially to pursue their livelihood activities.”

In El Geneina, she said, she heard from women “who are unable to return to their pre-war homes do to security concerns and fear of being raped, and others who spoke about “sexual violence committed in the context of inter-communal conflicts over land and resources.”

Patten said there were some “encouraging amendments brought recently to the criminal code, such as in the definition of rape, as well as on the establishment of women and child protection police units.”

At the same time, she noted that “there are no female judges in any of the five states of Darfur, and I expressed the need for female judges as well as more female police investigators and prosecutors.”

In Iraq, she heard from displaced women who expressed “serious safety concerns regarding their return to their homes due to activity from different militia groups and the reported presence of former Daesh combatants within their community.”

Sunni women in particular, she said, “shared their fear of reprisals on account of the wrong perception of affiliation with Daesh.”

The Special Representative said the situation of survivors returning with children “is extremely disturbing,” noting that “while some religious leaders may show some empathy, the tribal leaders display a profound reluctance to accept children born of rape.”

She said she “urged the government to ensure that women and girls who are victims of Daesh are not wrongfully perceived as being affiliates, associates, or intelligence assets,” and “to ensure that all survivors of conflict related sexual violence are fully protected and that perpetrators are brought to justice.”
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