ROHINGYA / MONSOON HEALTH RISKS

21-Feb-2018 00:02:19
The World Health Organization (WHO) expressed concern about the health risks associated with the torrential rains of the monsoon season and its impact on Rohingya refugees. WHO


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STORY: ROHINGYA / MONSOON HEALTH RISKS
TRT: 02:19
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 02 FEBURUARY 2018, BALUKHALI CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH /14 FEBURUARY 2018, BALUKHALI CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH / JANUARY 2018, BALUKHALI CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH
SHOTLIST
JANUARY 2018, BALUKHALI CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

1. Wide shot, Makeshift Huts at Balukhali Camp
2. Wide shot, children walking near sewage
3. Wide shot, Dr. Tony Stewart walking up the hill
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr.Tony Stewart, Health Operations Lead, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The big concern is, really, come March when the rain starts and then the monsoon season in May, this whole area, which is really built on a hill side, is going to become a large muddy, flooded area and the risk of things like diarrhea, dysentery, mosquito-borne disease like dengue, malaria, and others are going to be a huge risk to the population.”

02 FEBURUARY 2018, BALUKHALI CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

5. Wide shot, pan of Balukhali camp
6. Wide shot, Health Cluster Coordinator, Dr. Kai Von Harbou, visiting Samaritan’s purse facility
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr.Kai Von Harbou, Health Cluster Coordinator, World Health Organization (WHO):
“If this area will be flooded, there is a high risk that water sources will be contaminated from the latrines, so we really strengthen the capacity to respond to an outbreak from any waterborne diseases in particular acute watery diarrhea, which is at high risk in the rainy season.”
8. Med shot, Dr. Kai Von Harbou looking at the camp
9.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr.Kai Von Harbou, Health Cluster Coordinator, World Health Organization (WHO):
“There are mainly three hazards that we anticipate. These are floods, landslides and cyclones that can affect those camps around these areas. And we are preparing several mechanisms to respond to those. We are also identifying those health facilities that are most at risk for any of these hazards and prioritize some of them that are the most important to provide services to the population for relocation into safer areas. Overall, we want to make sure that health services can continue to deliver during any flood or landslide that would occur but also that we have enough capacity to respond.”

14 FEBURUARY 2018, BALUKHALI CAMP, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

10. Wide shot, people on the busy road of the camp
11. Various shots, a man working on a sewage system
12. Wide shot, new channel for sewage
STORYLINE
Under the scorching sun of Balukhali camp – one of the 14 camps hosting approximately 900,000 Rohingya people who fled Myanmar to Bangladesh – it is difficult to imagine that the rainy season is fast approaching. The rainy season will put people at risk of floods, mudslides, and water and mosquito borne diseases. The World Health Organization (WHO) is preparing to ensure that vital health services can continue during the rainy season, which often brings with it monsoons.

Dr. Tony Stewart, WHO’s Health Operations Lead in Cox’s Bazar, is concerned about the health risks associated with the torrential rains of the monsoon season.

He said “the big concern is really, come March when the rain starts and then the monsoon season in May, this whole area that is built on a hill side, is going to become a large muddy, flooded area and the risk of things like diarrhea, dysentery, mosquito-borne disease like dengue, malaria, and others are going to be a huge risk to the population.”

At another camp, Balukhali, it is the first cloudy day in months. Dr Kai Von Harbou, Health Cluster Coordinator in Cox’s Bazar, has been visiting some of the health facilities here, like this one operated by Samaritan’s Purse, which is also preparing for the rainy season.

But Dr. Von Harbou’s main focus in the past week with WHO’s team is to map health facilities at risk of flooding. Plans are being prepared for the relocation of priority health facilities, in addition to equipping the facilities to accommodate patients suffering from Acute Watery Diarrhea (AWD). Last year, WHO conducted an Oral Cholera Vaccine campaign targeting more than 900,000 children.

Dr Von Harbou said “if this area will be flooded, there is a high risk that water sources will be contaminated from the latrines, so we really strengthen the capacity to respond to an outbreak of any waterborne diseases in particular (acute) watery diarrhea, which is a high risk in the rainy season.”

He added “we want to make sure that health services can continue to deliver during any flood or landslide that would occur but that we also have enough capacity to respond.”

WHO has mapped out 210 health facilities in the Ukhia area in Cox’s Bazar, 53 of which (25%) are at risk of being directly affected by flooding. Those facilities providing the most critical services will be relocated to safer areas, but space is very limited. WHO will therefore also support partners running health facilities to prepare for floods to mitigate the impacts on their structures. In addition, the Health Sector, coordinated by WHO, is establishing mobile medical teams to cover the most urgent health needs of the Rohingyas and host communities during floods, landslides or cyclones.
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