SOMALIA / DE CLERCQ VISIT WRAP

20-Feb-2018 00:02:51
The head of United Nations humanitarian efforts in Somalia, during his tour of the country, underlined the importance of improving communities’ resilience to better withstand the effects of recurring droughts, such as famines. UNSOM
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STORY: SOMALIA / DE CLERCQ VISIT WRAP
TRT: 02:51
SOURCE: UNSOM
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNSOM
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 FEBRUARY 2018, HARGEISA, SOMALILAND / 17 FEBRUARY 2018, GAROWE, PUNTLAND, SOMALIA
SHOTLIST
17 FEBRUARY 2018, GAROWE SOMALIA

1. Wide shot, Peter de Clercq, United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia, getting off the plane on arrival Med shot, 2. de Clercq is received by the UN staff in Garowe
3. Wide shot, de Clercq and UN staff walking
4. Various shots, the convoy driving through Garowe Town
5. Close up, Somalia and Puntland flags
6. Pan left, Puntland State House
7. Wide shot, de Clercq entering Puntland State House
8. Wide shot, Puntland President H.E Abdiweli Ali Gaas greeting de Clercq
9. Med shot, Gaas and de Clercq
10. Med shot, Gaas
11. Wide shot, Gaas and de Clercq in a meeting
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Abdiweli Ali Gaas, Puntland President:
“Today we specifically discussed the issue of the drought which we expect maybe imminent and how we can mitigate the effect of that drought, how we can help the people that have been displaced by the previous droughts and other issues. And our discussion and other matters also for UN and for Puntland; and our discussion, and frank and candid discussion really, was I think very fruitful.”
13. Med shot, Gaas and de Clercq in a meeting
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter de Clercq, United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia: “The situation is very serious particularly in Sool and Sanaag. And we have talked about how we can best reach the people in Sool and Sanaag in terms of providing them with the assistance that they deserve that will keep them from being affected by this drought and possibly falling into famine.”

19 FEBRUARY 2018, HARGEISA, SOMALILAND

15. Wide shot, de Clercq and UN staff walking on tarmac
16. Wide shot, Hargeisa Airport
17. Wide shot, Hargeisa town
18. Med shot, Somaliland President, H.E Muse Bihi Abdi, welcomes de Clercq
19. Wide shot, conference table
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter de Clercq, United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia:
“We are seeing a lot of displacement. We are seeing the cities and towns in Somaliland growing, and more and more destitute people who have lost their livestock and lost their livelihood coming to the cities in expectation of some support and some assistance. And unfortunately, the historic trend is we will be, many of these people not going back.”
21. Various shots, round table meeting between Somaliland ministers and UN delegation
22. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter de Clercq, United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia:
“Yes, we are going to have a drought, yes things are getting very bad, but we want this cycle to stop. We don’t want to have every few years to launch another relief operation, a humanitarian effort. We need to make sure that the country does grow its own food, and produces its own wealth so that people no longer have to rely on outside handouts.”
23. Wide shot, ministers and UN officials leaving the meeting
STORYLINE
The head of United Nations humanitarian efforts in Somalia, during his tour of the country, underlined the importance of improving communities’ resilience to better withstand the effects of recurring droughts, such as famines.

The UN’s Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia, Peter de Clercq on Saturday (17 Feb) arrived in Puntland’s capital, Garowe and commended the drought relief and recovery efforts of the authorities in the northern state of Puntland, while cautioning that the current humanitarian crisis was far from over.

De Clercq met with Puntland President’s Abdiweli Ali Gaas.

SOUNDBITE (English) Abdiweli Ali Gaas, Puntland President:
“Today we specifically discussed the issue of the drought which we expect maybe imminent and how we can mitigate the effect of that drought, how we can help the people that have been displaced by the previous droughts and other issues. And our discussion and other matters also for UN and for Puntland; and our discussion, and frank and candid discussion really, was I think very fruitful.”

Speaking on the collective response so far to the drought that has affected Puntland and the rest of Somalia for over five failed rain cycles, de Clercq said that, while 2017 was a good year in terms of close cooperation to avoid the worst impact of the drought, further effort would be needed.

SOUNDBITE (English) Peter de Clercq, United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia: “The situation is very serious particularly in Sool and Sanaag. And we have talked about how we can best reach the people in Sool and Sanaag in terms of providing them with the assistance that they deserve that will keep them from being affected by this drought and possibly falling into famine.”

De Clercq was visiting Puntland to meet with security, planning and humanitarian officials from the local government, as well as representatives of civil society organizations, to discuss the current drought response and other challenges in the region.

The UN official arrived in Hargeisa, the capital of Somaliland on Monday (19 Feb) where he met with various high-level officials and civil society representatives. A key topic in his encounters was that while famine had been averted in the northeast of the Horn of Africa in 2017 – thanks to the efforts of Somalis and their international partners – the risk of famine associated with the drought is still very present, with millions of people in the region still in need of life-saving humanitarian assistance.

Results of a recent drought impact needs assessment, led by Somalia’s federal and regional governments with the support of international partners, point to food insecurity and rapid urbanization as some of the underlying causes of the humanitarian emergency.

SOUNDBITE (English) Peter de Clercq, United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia:
“We are seeing a lot of displacement. We are seeing the cities and towns in Somaliland growing, and more and more destitute people who have lost their livestock and lost their livelihood coming to the cities in expectation of some support and some assistance. And unfortunately, the historic trend is we will be, many of these people not going back.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Peter de Clercq, United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia:
“Yes, we are going to have a drought, yes things are getting very bad, but we want this cycle to stop. We don’t want to have every few years to launch another relief operation, a humanitarian effort. We need to make sure that the country does grow its own food, and produces its own wealth so that people no longer have to rely on outside handouts.’

In his meetings, the Humanitarian Coordinator – who also serves as the Secretary-General’s Deputy Special Representative for Somalia and the UN Resident Coordinator – highlighted that, far from competing, both emergency relief and longer-term resilience-building efforts complemented each other with a view to breaking the cycle of drought and famine.
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