NOTTINGHAM / FOOTBALL REFUGEES

19-Feb-2018 00:02:59
The Notts County Football Club has brought refugees into their community, on and off the pitch. Their charity arm, “Football in the Community” provides free football sessions to more than 200 refugees, aiming to make them feel welcome and provide a chance to improve physical and mental wellbeing. UNHCR
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STORY: NOTTINGHAM / FOOTBALL REFUGEES
TRT: 02:59
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11-14 DECEMBER 2017, NOTTINGHAM, ENGLAND
SHOTLIST
14 DECEMBER 2017, NOTTINGHAM, ENGLAND

1. Wide shot, Floodlights on pitch
2. Close up, shoe being laced
3. Various shots, refugees and coach enter pitch
4. Various shots, ball being passed around
5. Various shots, warmup exercises
6. Various shots, refugees playing football
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Omar Saddiq, Sudanese refugee:
“When I play football, I feel happy and I feel different. It’s very nice, the football.”
8. Close up, Omar playing football
9. Wide shot, coach handing out bibs
10. Close up, game kick-off
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Tim Hatton, Senior Manager, Football in the Community:
“We know that they don’t have jobs; they don’t have family; a lot of them can’t speak English. A lot have them have low-level anxiety, depression, that sort of things, so we thought we can do something for them.”

11 DECEMBER 2017, NOTTINGHAM, ENGLAND

12. Wide shot, door to indoor gym at Nottingham College
13. Various shots, refugees playing indoor football
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Senay Zeryzghi, Eritrean refugee:
“It’s very useful for me at the moment because I don’t have enough English. I don’t have enough skills, and then I just want to make new friends.”
15. Wide shot, Senay high-fiving teammates
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Will Thompson, Sports Coordinator, Nottingham College
“It gives them the opportunity to go meet people outside of their classroom, to improve on their language skills, to learn other attributes.”
17. Wide shot, players on bench
18. Wide shot, Will watching match
19. Various shots, refugees playing indoor football
STORYLINE
The Notts County Football Club has brought refugees into their community, on and off the pitch. Their charity arm, “Football in the Community” provides free football sessions to more than 200 refugees, aiming to make them feel welcome and provide a chance to improve physical and mental wellbeing.

By the end of 2016, about 116,000 refugees were estimated to be in the United Kingdom, among them about 8000 living in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire. Several football clubs around the country have reached out to refugees in the belief that football can help them better integrate and feel at home.

SOUNDBITE (English) Omar Saddiq, Sudanese refugee:
“When I play football, I feel happy and I feel different. It’s very nice, the football.”

Omar was only 15 when he fled Sudan alone. He came to the United Kingdom in 2016. Now, he and other young refugees come here each week to train with Notts County FC which has been running this programme for two years now.

Tim Hatton, Senior Manager at Football in the Community said the programme uses the power of football to set positive role models and help change peoples’ lives.

SOUNDBITE (English) Tim Hatton, Senior Manager, Football in the Community:
“We know that they don’t have jobs; they don’t have family; a lot of them can’t speak English. A lot have them have low-level anxiety, depression, that sort of things, so we thought we can do something for them.”

The club organises free training sessions twice a week, including for refugee students at Nottingham College

SOUNDBITE (English) Senay Zeryzghi, Eritrean refugee:
“It’s very useful for me at the moment because I don’t have enough English. I don’t have enough skills, and then I just want to make new friends.”

Nottingham College’s Sports Coordinator Will Thompson said people could learn many things through sports without realising that they are in fact learning, such as teamwork and leadership.

SOUNDBITE (English) Will Thompson, Sports Coordinator, Nottingham College
“It gives them the opportunity to go meet people outside of their classroom, to improve on their language skills, to learn other attributes.”

Notts County FC said it also wants to nurture football talent among aspiring refugees. Senay said he aspires to play in the Premier League some day.
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