UNICEF / NEWBORN MORTALITY

19-Feb-2018 00:03:06
The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) warned in a new report that global deaths of newborn babies remain alarmingly high, particularly among the world’s poorest countries. UNICEF / UNIFEED
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STORY: UNICEF / NEWBORN MORTALITY
TRT: 03:06
SOURCE: UNICEF / UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNICEF FOOTAGE ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 15 FEBRUARY 2018, NEW YORK CITY / RECENT
SHOTLIST
UNICEF - 31 JANUARY 2018, TONJ STATE, SOUTH SUDAN

1. Wide shot, UNICEF aid worker and doctor examine pregnant woman
2. Close up, UNICEF aid worker and doctor examine pregnant woman
3. Wide shot, two women and a baby sitting on clinic bed
4. Close up, baby in mother’s arms

15 FEBRUARY 2018, NEW YORK CITY

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Willibald Zeck, Senior Health Adviser, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF):
“I think a lot of good things have happened and are happening, but where we really have a major gap in newborn mortality. So, countries in the last 20 years, and governments together with partners like us, have really made really big achievements in reducing mortality rates, but the newborn [mortality] is really the new gap; and this is why we are bringing out this report. Because we see that this is the area where we can really make a change until 2030. And if we change the mortality rate or decrease the mortality rate of newborns, we can make a big change for many many countries around the globe.”

UNICEF - 7 FEBRUARY, 2018, CHONG ALAI DISTRICT, KYRGYZSTAN

6. Wide shot, doctor aiding pregnant woman with heavy contractions
7. Med shot, doctor aiding pregnant woman with heavy contractions
8. Close up, woman having heavy contractions
9. Tilt down, doctor aiding pregnant woman with heavy contractions
10. Med shots, medical staff tending to woman in labour
11. Med shot, doctor and nurses wiping newborn baby with blanket
12. Close up, mother lying in bed with newborn baby

UNICEF - SEPTEMBER, 2017, BATU, EAST-JAVA, INDONESIA

13. Med shot, midwife aiding pregnant woman
14. Wide shots, woman having heavy contractions
15. Close up; newborn baby
16. Close up, mother holding newborn baby
17. Close up, newborn baby

15 FEBRUARY 2018, NEW YORK CITY

18. SOUNDBITE (English) Willibald Zeck, Senior Health Adviser, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF):
“UNICEF is focusing now in many countries on quality of care. What we see is that we have empowerment of women and empowerment of service providers. We have people in place in many cases and in many countries, and we have also the skills but the quality is missing. And I think this is why some of the countries are still lagging behind. So, we hope to focus on quality of care to make sure that newborns can be saved and can be alive. It’s basically the four P’s: Power, People, Place, and Products; and products means that we also provide commodities for hospitals on district level.”


UNICEF - 25 JANUARY, 2018, MUNA GARAGE IDP CAMP, MAIDUGURI, BORNO STATE, NIGERIA

19. Wide shots, mothers and babies waiting to be seen
20. Close up, baby in mother’s arms
21. Wide shot, doctor placing baby on an examination bed
22. Med shot, doctor measuring circumference of baby’s head
23. Close up, doctor measuring circumference of baby’s head

UNICEF - 9 SEPTEMBER, 2017, MALAWI

24. Med shot, doctor aiding pregnant woman in labour
25. Close up, newborn baby
26. Med shot, doctor attending to newborn baby
27. Close up, newborn baby bundled up in blanket
28. Close up, mother lying in bed with newborn baby
STORYLINE
The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) warned in a new report that global deaths of newborn babies remain alarmingly high, particularly among the world’s poorest countries.

In its “Every Child Alive” report release today (20 Feb), UNICEF said babies born in Japan, Iceland and Singapore had the best chance at survival, while newborns in Pakistan, the Central African Republic and Afghanistan faced the worst odds.

The report said, globally, in low-income countries, the average newborn mortality rate was 27 deaths per 1,000 births, while in high-income countries, that rate is 3 deaths per 1,000. It found that newborns from the riskiest places to give birth were up to 50 times more likely to die than those from the safest places.

UNICEF Senior Health Adviser Willibald Zeck said the main factors behind the newborn mortality rate were prematurity, complications during birth, and illness. He said there has been progress in overall child mortality worldwide, however “a major gap in newborn mortality” persists. Zeck said the aim of the report is to bring about real change by 2030 adding, “if we change the mortality rate or decrease the mortality rate of newborns, we can make a big change for many many countries around the globe.”

The report also noted that eight of the ten most dangerous places to be born are in sub-Saharan Africa, where pregnant women are much less likely to receive assistance during delivery due to poverty, conflict, and weak institutions. UNICEF said if every country brought its newborn mortality rate down to the high-income average by 2030, 16 million lives could be saved.

Zeck said UNICEF was now focusing on the quality of care being provided in many countries, “to make sure that newborns can be saved and can be alive; it’s basically the four P’s: Power, People, Place, and Products; and products means that we also provide commodities for hospitals on district level.”

UNICEF said deaths could be prevented with access to well-trained midwives, along with proven solutions like clean water, disinfectants, breastfeeding within the first hour, skin-to-skin contact and good nutrition.

The report also marks the launching of UNICEF’s global “Every Child Alive” campaign to demand and deliver solutions on behalf of the world’s newborns. Through the campaign, UNICEF is issuing an urgent appeal to governments, health care providers, donors, the private sector, families and businesses to keep every child alive through affordable, quality health care solutions for every mother and every newborn.
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