IRAQ / MOSUL CHILDREN

07-Feb-2018 00:03:20
United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) said about 750,000 children in Mosul and surrounding areas are struggling to access basic health services. UNICEF
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UNICEF/IRAQ
STORY: IRAQ / MOSUL CHILDREN
TRT: 03:20
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNICEF ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 4-5 FEBRUARY 2018, Mosel, Iraq
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, houses destruction
2. Wide shot, children
3. Med shot, ruined Ambulance
4. Various shots, medicines
5. Close up, syringe needles damaged on the ground
6. Various shots, ruined hospital
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Hawkins, UNICEF representative in Iraq:
“This city, this is part of a hospital as we see it today; it was completely flattened. There are parts of the hospital that remain more or less intact, but gutted, nothing, no health services for the children of Mosul; a population now of probably about 1.6 million.”
8. Wide shot, lobby in Khansah Hospital
9. Med shot, Peter Hawkins in the cold room. Cold room for keeping medical supplies
10. Med shot, freezers
11. Various shots, Peter Hawkins talking with a family in the vaccine room
12. Wide shot, a baby in the vaccine room
13. Med shot, SM Moazzem Hossain (Chief of health and Nutrition – UNICEF/IRAQ) talking with a family in the vaccine room.
14. Wide shot, Preterm (premature birth) infants
15. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hammed, parent of patient:
“The situation of the hospital is really bad. It needs a lot of work to get before to get it to where it needs to be. As you see, the hospital is abandoned and destroyed, health workers are doing their best, but they are struggling. The birth hall has been destroyed, and the staff is using a much smaller room.”
16. Med shot, a baby receiving vaccine
17. Med shot, a nurse putting a baby in the Incubator
18. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Ahmed, Doctors Assistant:
“The hospitals require a lot of reconstruction, look to the destruction. We need medicine, we need everything. If you ask any of the staff why are you not coming to work, they say they cannot work without salaries and they cannot pay for their uniforms.”
STORYLINE
United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) said about 750,000 children in Mosul and surrounding areas are struggling to access basic health services.

Three years of intense violence have devastated health facilities in Iraq. Over 60 health facilities have repeatedly come under attack since the escalation of violence in 2014, severely disrupting access to basic health services for children and families.

According to UNICEF, while violence has subsided, less than 10 percent of health facilities in Ninewah governorate are functioning at full capacity. Those that are operational are stretched to breaking point.

Peter Hawkins, UNICEF’s Representative in Iraq, visited hospitals and primary health care facility in Mosul and witnessed the level of destruction and devastation to Iraq’s health care system.

He said “this city, this is part of a hospital as we see it today; it was completely flattened. There are parts of the hospital that remain more or less intact, but gutted, nothing, no health services for the children of Mosul; a population now of probably about 1.6 million.”

Hammed, a parent of a patient said “the situation of the hospital is really bad. It needs a lot of work to get before to get it to where it needs to be. As you see, the hospital is abandoned and destroyed, health workers are doing their best, but they are struggling. The birth hall has been destroyed, and the staff is using a much smaller room.”

Ahmed, who is an assistant to the doctors said “the hospitals require a lot of reconstruction, look to the destruction. We need medicine, we need everything. If you ask any of the staff why are you not coming to work, they say they cannot work without salaries and they cannot pay for their uniforms.”
UNICEF has stepped up its support to primary healthcare facilities to help the Government of Iraq provide critical health services so that children and families affected by violence and displacement can resume their lives.

In Mosul, UNICEF has rehabilitated the pediatric and nutritional wards of two hospital centres, provided refrigerators to store vaccines for up to 250,000 children, and supported vaccination campaigns to immunize all children under five years old. Most health centers in the governorate have also re-started vaccination services for children.
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unifeed180207b