UN / MIGRATION ARBOUR

11-Jan-2018 00:02:04
A new United Nations (UN) report released today (11 Jan) says that managing migration is one of the most urgent and profound tests of international cooperation in our time. UNIFEED
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: UN / MIGRATION ARBOUR
TRT: 02:04
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: EMBARGOED UNTIL 15:00 GMT, 11 JANUARY 2018
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 10 JANUARY 2018, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations Headquarters

10 JANUARY 2018, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for International Migration, United Nations:
“It has become increasingly apparent that well managed migration yields enormous benefit, economic social benefits. In contrast, poorly managed migration that is bad national policies and non-existent international cooperation actually feed into a vicious circle of hostile public opinion which then calls for inappropriate policy responses, mostly security responses. And then we were caught in this vicious circle.”
4. Med shot, journalists
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for International Migration, United Nations:
“48 per cent of the migrants are women and very interestingly, they work, they migrate very often on their own rights, not just as part of a family unit. The labor force of participation of women migrants is 67 per cent compared to worldwide 51 per cent for women.”
6. Med shot, journalists
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for International Migration, United Nations:
“Currently migrants spend 85 per cent of their income in their host community, paying rent, taxes and cost of living, and they send home 15 per cent. That 15 per cent represent today approximately 600 billion dollars annually. That amount is broken down into about 450 dollars going to developing countries.”
8. Wide shot, press briefing room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for International Migration, United Nations:
“A multinational, multilateral exercise such as this one is always regrettable is one of the parties are not present throughout. Member States are coming with a lot of different views, interests and ideas and so on. And I hope the next 6 months, they will come together towards what is essentially has been described from the beginning, it is clear to all, it is an agreement to cooperate.”
10. Wide shot, conference room
STORYLINE
A new United Nations (UN) report released today (11 Jan) says that managing migration is one of the most urgent and profound tests of international cooperation in our time.

Speaking to reporters on Wednesday (10 Jan), the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for International Migration Louise Arbour said “it has become increasingly apparent that well managed migration yields enormous benefit, economic social benefits.”

She added “in contrast, poorly managed migration that is bad national policies and non-existent international cooperation actually feed into a vicious circle of hostile public opinion which then calls for inappropriate policy responses, mostly security responses. And then we were caught in this vicious circle.”

The report points to an estimated 258 million international migrants, or 34 per cent of the world’s population, with levels expected to increase. While the majority of migrants move between countries in a safe, orderly and regular manner, a significant minority of migrants face life-threatening conditions.
The report also underscores the economic benefits of migration.

Reiterating that women migrants constitute an important economic factor, Arbour said that 48 per cent of the migrants are women and they migrate very often on their own rights, not just as part of a family unit.

She added “the labor force of participation of women migrants is 67 per cent compared to worldwide 51 per cent for women.”

On the link between migration and development, Arbour highlighted the critical impact of remittances, saying that currently migrants spend 85 per cent of their income in their host community and send home 15 per cent.

She added “that 15 per cent represent today approximately 600 billion dollars annually. That amount is broken down into about 450 dollars going to developing countries.”

Asked about the United States withdrawal from the Global Compact negotiation, Arbour said “a multinational, multilateral exercise such as this one is always regrettable that one of the parties are not present throughout.”

She added “Member States are coming with a lot of different views, interests and ideas and so on. And I hope the next 6 months, they will come together towards what is essentially has been described from the beginning, it is clear to all, it is an agreement to cooperate.”

Making Migration Work for All, the report released today to the UN General Assembly, is the Secretary-General’s contribution to the process of developing a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular. The report offers the Secretary-General’s vision for constructive international cooperation, examining how to better manage migration, for the benefit of all – the migrants themselves, their host communities and their societies of origin.
Category
Topical Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed180111a