GENEVA / HUMANITARIAN AID

22-Jun-2017 00:02:27
A new report on humanitarian assistance in high-risk environments found that too few aid groups are able to stay and deliver life-saving assistance to vulnerable communities in conflict areas. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / HUMANITARIAN AID
TRT: 02:27
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 22 JUNE 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
22 JUNE 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Palais des Nations exterior
2. Wide shot, Stephen O’Brien and Jan Egeland walking down hall
3. Wide shot, O’Brien and Egeland at stakeout
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephen O’Brien, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“There has been a genuine, I think, mark of success but at the same time a real pointer as to what we need to do better in the future to make sure we can really live up to that phrase ‘to stay and deliver’ once the world itself has become ever more chaotic, ever more challenging in complex protracted violence and conflict driven crises that give humanitarian needs to those vulnerable populations on the planet. And that is the challenge we have, to make this work even as the context gets more challenging and far more voluminous.”
5. Med shot, journalists
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Egeland, Secretary-General, Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC):
“We have to be ruthlessly honest with ourselves. There are too few aid workers where women, children, wounded, the most vulnerable often need us the most. This is very dangerous; it is very difficult; it is very resource intensive work to go and stay and deliver around Fallujah in Iraq, in the countryside of Somalia, in north-eastern Nigeria.”
7. Med shot, journalists
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Egeland, Secretary-General, Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC):
“We need a stronger partnership with the donors. They have to take the risk with us; they have to invest in the risk management and in all of the security efforts that are needed. At the moment those who we often fail too much are the national relief workers who are much more exposed to attacks even than the international aid workers.”
9. Medium shot, journalists
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephen O’Brien, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations:
“It is obviously an area of intense frustration for us when well designed plans for convoys and supplies don’t proceed, but the main thing is to get through everything we possibly can and to continue to make through the reports I make to the Security Council on a monthly basis a very clear accountability for what we need to send and indeed what we can and what we can’t”.
11. Wide shot, people walking down hall
12. Close up, UN logo
STORYLINE
A new report on humanitarian assistance in high-risk environments found that too few aid groups are able to stay and deliver life-saving assistance to vulnerable communities in conflict areas.

The report titled “Presence and Proximity: To Stay and Deliver, Five Years On” was presented today (22 Jun) by UN humanitarian chief Stephen O’Brien and Jan Egeland, Secretary-General of the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC).

Speaking to journalists in Geneva, O’Brien said there has been a genuine “mark of success but at the same time a real pointer as to what we need to do better in the future to make sure we can really live up to that phrase ‘to stay and deliver’ once the world itself has become ever more chaotic, ever more challenging in complex protracted violence and conflict driven crises that give humanitarian needs to those vulnerable populations on the planet.”

According to the new report, the changing nature of conflicts, attacks against aid workers, and a lack of dedicated funding and risk management capacity have prevented an increase in the number of organisations being physically present in the most dangerous flashpoints in the world.

Egeland said the international community is failing too many people in too many places and extreme risks and threats are paralysing too many organisations and their ability to deliver aid and save lives. He stressed that there are “too few aid workers where women, children, wounded, the most vulnerable often need us the most.”

The report also showed that the organizations with flexible resources were among those best able to stay and deliver. Egeland noted that donors have to take the risk and “invest in the risk management and in all of the security efforts that are needed.” He said currently “those who we often fail too much are the national relief workers who are much more exposed to attacks” than international aid workers.

Asked about the humanitarian aid in Syria, O’Brien said it was obviously an area of “intense frustration” as well designed plans for convoys and supplies often do not proceed. He said the main objective for his office is to deliver everything they possibly could “and to continue to make through the reports I make to the Security Council on a monthly basis a very clear accountability for what we need to send and indeed what we can and what we can’t.”

The new report follows the 2011 study called “To Stay and Deliver” led by Jan Egeland on how humanitarian organisations could strive to provide aid in highly insecure environments.
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