GA / DAESH

19-Sep-2016 00:03:10
Belgian Foreign Minister Didier Reynders said fighting impunity for war crimes in the Middle East was “indispensable” to rebuild a resilient society in the region. UNIFEED
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STORY: GA / DAESH
TRT: 3:10
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 SEPTEMBER 2016, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
19 SEPTEMBER 2016, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior
2. Close up, Amal Clooney outside conference room
3. Close up, Boris Johnson entering conference room
4. Wide shot, conference room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Didier Reynders, Foreign Minister, Belgium:
“To rebuild a resilient society in the region on solid foundations, fighting impunity is indispensable. If we want to give reconciliation a chance, we need to ensure that those responsible for atrocities committed in Syria and Iraq are held accountable.”
6. Wide shot, conference room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Didier Reynders, Foreign Minister, Belgium:
“It is an ideology that we are fighting, an ideology of hate, of the near end of the absolute value of every human being. We are coming together around a universal message of tolerance, respect, and equal dignity for all and that message will win in the end.”
8. Wide shot, conference room
9. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Ibrahim Al-Jaafari, Foreign Minister, Iraq:
“Terrorism in its cross-border nature and the diversity of its forms and sources is the international challenge that affects all aspects of life. And in this international capacity it challenges the legal and moral frameworks that rule the international community. These extremist, takfiri, violent and dangerous ideas are a direct threat to international peace and security.”
10. Wide shot, conference room
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Boris Johnson, Foreign Minister, Uniked Kingdom:
“Da’esh’s whole ambition, its raison d’etre, is to create disunity, bloodshed, and hate. We are uniting to fight Da’esh and I believe we should unite to bring them to justice.”
12. Wide shot, conference room
13. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Nadia Murad Basee Taha, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Goodwill Ambassador for the Dignity of Survivors of Human Trafficking:
“My country which is supposed to be my country did not convene a single meeting in its government or parliament regarding our genocide. As if we aren’t citizens. My country hasn’t taken a single step to bring justice. They refuse to join the Rome Statute. They refuse the specialization of the International Criminal Court. They refuse even creating committees for the crimes.”
14. Wide shot, conference room
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Amal Clooney, Human Rights Lawyer:
“Frankly speaking if we can’t go after ISIS (ISIL) for these acts then all of us who are lawyers or diplomats or officials here today should be ashamed. Years from now I believe we will look back and ask ourselves ‘what did we do in the face of genocide? What did we do to combat this brutal group that seeks to wipe out minorities in the Middle East and break the spirit of a generation of young girls? Will we say it was too difficult or that it was inconvenient or will we say that we joined forces and put alleged war criminals on trial?”
16. Med shot, meeting ends
STORYLINE
Belgian Foreign Minister Didier Reynders said fighting impunity for war crimes in the Middle East was “indispensable” to rebuild a resilient society in the region.

In a meeting today (19 Sep) on bringing Da’esh (ISIL) to justice, Reynders said stopping the terrorist group militarily was not sufficient and crimes in the region were not limited to them. He said the Middle East had a long history of coexistence between different religious communities and ethnic groups, and to give reconciliation a chance, “we need to ensure that those responsible for atrocities committed in Syria and Iraq are held accountable.”
Reynders said the crimes committed by Da’esh were extreme in their drive to destroy the cultural heritage of “a region where civilization was born.” The Belgian Foreign Minister said Da’esh must be stopped and the war in Syria must come to an end. He said the international community was fighting an ideology of hate and was coming together around a universal message of tolerance, respect, and equal dignity for all and “that message will win in the end.”

Iraqi Foreign Minister Ibrahim Al-Jaafari said terrorism was an international challenge that affected all aspects of life and challenged “the legal and moral frameworks that rule the international community.” He said the group’s extremist ideas were a direct threat to international peace and security and were counter to the teachings of the Islamic faith and the “nature of humanity.” He said for justice to be served for the victims for Da’esh, the group’s extremist ideology should be considered a crime against humanity. He said the group’s leadership must be arrested and the “genocide” committed by the group against different components of the Iraqi society should not be allowed to pass. In addition, Al-Jaafari called on the international community to assist Iraq in building its security and judicial branches in order to gather evidence on the group’s crimes.

British Foreign Minister Boris Johnson said Da’esh was failing in its “preposterous ambition to create kalifate in Iraq and Syria.” He said as the group was losing ground in the two countries, thousands of people were “proclaiming their joy at being liberated from Da’esh rule, but whenever they are pushed back, Da’esh leave an ineradicable scar on those communities; torture, massacre, rape, mass enslavement of minorities.” He added that in the after math of such crimes, the international community had an obligation to ensure that justice was done. He said the campaign should be focused “exclusively on Da’esh.” He said, “The accountability of other actors in the area in Syria, Iraq and Libya must be dealt with, but I think there are other ways elsewhere that that accountably can be pursued.”

United Nations (UN) goodwill ambassador for human trafficking, Nadia Murad Basee said Da’esh “brought to the world a new barbarism which is unheard of and created for itself methods which aim to destroy all of humanity.” She said two year after the Yazidi genocide those who committed the crimes are “still free and control the majority of areas.” Murad asked, “How could we be proud of our humanity as we fail to call genocide in its correct name?” Murad said over 40 mass graves were discovered in Iraq and the evidence was lost “every day.”

Human rights lawyer Amal Clooney said over 5,000 Yazidis had been killed and over 3,000 women and children remained enslaved by Da’esh and the killings and rapes continued to this day. She said the UN acknowledged that this was genocide, yet there had not been a single member of Da’esh held to account in a court anywhere in the world for this crime. Clooney asked if the international community did not act on genocide, “what is it that would make us act.” She said she put forward a proposal to the Security Council on behalf of Da’esh survivors she represents seeking that the Council send a team of “professional investigators to gather evidence of crimes committed by ISIS in Iraq.” She said this commission would investigate crimes committed against all Iraqis including Suunis, Shia, and Christians, as well as Yazidis. She said the evidence gathered could then be shared with the International Criminal Court or a new international or hybrid court, as well as national prosecutors.
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