FAO / ILLEGAL FISHING

16-May-2016 00:00:48
Illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing is about to become much more difficult thanks to the imminent entry into force of the Port State Measures Agreement (PSMA), a ground-breaking international accord championed by FAO. FILE
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STORY: FAO / ILLEGAL FISHING
TRT: 00:48
SOURCE: FILE
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: NATS

DATELINE: FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – WORLD BANK - 2013 – BANGLADESH

1. Wide shot, port
2. Wide shot, trucks driving in port

FILE – ILO- NOVEMBER 2015, GAZA, PALESTINE

3. Various shots, fishermen pulling fishing net

FILE – UNEP- 17 MAY 2014, LA CALETA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

4. Wide shot, underwater view of fish trap going up to the surface
5. Close up, fish in fish trap as it’s going up to the surface
6. Med shot, fishermen placing fish trap in the boat
7. Med shot, fishermen emptying fish trap in the boat

FILE – WHO – MARCH 2015 – FRANCE – RUNGIS - FOOD MARKET

8. Wide shot, market
9. Wide shot, fish boxes
10.Close up, seafood
11. Close up, worker handling fish boxes
STORYLINE
Illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing is about to become much more difficult thanks to the imminent entry into force of the Port State Measures Agreement (PSMA), a ground-breaking international accord championed by FAO.

Now that the required threshold has been reached, with 30 Members having formally deposited their instruments of adherence, the count down to the entry into force of the PSMA is underway and on 5 June 2016 the world's first ever binding international accord specifically targeting IUU fishing will become international law.

Collectively, the 29 countries and the European Union, which signed as a single party, have formally committed themselves through their instruments of adhesion to the Agreement account for more than 62 percent of worldwide fish imports and 49 percent of fish exports, which were $133 billion and $139 billion respectively, in 2013.

Each year, IUU fishing is responsible for annual catches of up to 26 million tonnes, with a value of up to USD 23 billion. It also undermines efforts to ensure sustainable fisheries and responsible fish stock management around the world.
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unifeed160516b