GENEVA / CARTOONISTS FOR PEACE

03-May-2016 00:03:06
On the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, the United Nations in Geneva hosted a series of events to showcase the work of cartoonists working in support of peace and human rights. UNTV CH
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: GENEVA / CARTOONISTS FOR PEACE
TRT: 3:06
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 3 MAY 2016 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, Cinema room Grütli, Geneva
2. UPSOUND (French) Presenter:
"On this International Press Freedom Day, I call on all governments, political leaders, businesses and citizens to promote and protect the independence and freedom of the media."
3. Various shots, audience
4. Med shot, film screening
5. Wide shot, panel discussion
6. Various shots, audience
7. SOUNDBITE (French) Plantu (Jean Pantureux), cartoonist, French daily Le Monde:
“The name of this movie, 'Cartoonists - Foot Soldiers of Democracy', is very appropriate, because my fellow cartoonists are truly foot soldiers of democracy. In Europe we have a tendency to fall asleep, we don't have a power like a dictatorship telling us what we have to draw or what we can't, them, they know what to do.”
8. Close up, hand
9. SOUNDBITE (French) Plantu:
“Ten years ago we created, it's been just ten years since we created cartoonist for peace where we mixed origins, Muslims, Christians, Jews, agnostics, atheist cartoonists, in order to build a bridge where others try to create a gap."
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Liza Donnelly, Cartoonist, The New Yorker:
“What I like about cartooning for peace it brings attention to cartoons around the world and particularly cartoonist who are having problems with their rulers in their countries. So with this prize that we give every other year it sheds light on cartoonists that are having difficulties either being threatened or lo sing their incomes or jailed and so it gives attention to those cartoonist. Also, as Americans we are so insular, we don’t, we look at the headlines of what’s going on in another country, but with cartoons you get to see what’s going on very specifically and on the ground so cartoons are a great way to communicate issues that we may not get in the headline news.”
11. Wide shot, exposition by Geneva lake
12. Wide shot, cartoons exposition
13. Close up, cartoonist’s name “Zunar”
14. Tilt down, cartoon
15. UPSOUND (English) Zunar, cartoonist:
“In one picture, this is the law they use, three laws now, against me."
16. UPSOUND (English) Kofi Annan, former Secretary-Genera, United Nations:
"Against you?"
17. UPSOUND (English) Zunar, cartoonist:
"Yeah, this is me, this is my self portrait. This is the printing and press act, where they banned all my publications, and then the sedition act when they arrested me twice, and then the penal code."
18. Pan left, exhibition by the lake
19. Med shot, group picture with cartoonist and Kofi Annan
STORYLINE
On the occasion of World Press Freedom Day (3 May), the United Nations in Geneva hosted a series of events to showcase the work of cartoonists working in support of peace and human rights.

World-renowned cartoonists Plantu (Jean Pantureux) of the French daily Le Monde, and Liza Donnelly, best known for her work in the iconic weekly magazine The New Yorker, attended a film screening at cinema Grütli in Geneva.

They were both on hand to support the work of cartoonists who face obstacles, censure, threats in speaking truth to power.

Plantu himself is followed 24/7 by armed guards since the attacks on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris in January 2015.

Their appearance coincided with the screening of the film 'Cartoonists - Foot Soldiers of Democracy', a 2014 documentary film directed by Stéphanie Valloatto about 12 cartoonists around the world who risk their lives to defend democracy, organized by the UN Information Service in Geneva. The film was nominated for the César Award for Best Documentary Film at the 40th César Awards.

“The name of this movie, 'Cartoonists - Foot Soldiers of Democracy', is very appropriate," said Plantu, "because my fellow cartoonists truly are foot soldiers of democracy. In Europe we have a tendency to fall asleep; we don't have a power like a dictatorship telling us what we have to draw or what we can't. But they, they know what to do.”

Plantu is a member of Cartooning for Peace, an international network of committed press cartoonists, who fight -- with humour -- for the respect of cultures and freedoms. The network came together in 2006 under the stewardship of former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan.
Plantu said, “it's been just ten years since we created Cartoonists for Peace, where we mixed origins, Muslims, Christians, Jews, agnostics, atheists cartoonists, in order to build a bridge where others try to create a division."

Another reason for these cartoonists presence in the Swiss city is the yearly awarding Cartooning for Peace Prize, which this year went to Kenyan caricaturist Gado and Malaysian cartoonist Zunar.

Cartoonist Liza Donnely said “what I like about Cartooning for Peace is that it brings attention to cartoons around the world and particularly cartoonist who are having problems with their rulers in their countries."

She added, "so with this prize that we give every other year it sheds light on cartoonists that are having difficulties either being threatened or loosing their incomes or jailed and so it gives attention to those cartoonist. Also, as Americans we are so insular, we don’t, we look at the headlines of what’s going on in another country, but with cartoons you get to see what’s going on very specifically and on the ground so cartoons are a great way to communicate issues that we may not get in the headline news.”
Category
Topical Subjects
Personal Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed160503h