UN / HUMAN TRAFFICKING

07-Apr-2016 00:02:38
More than 21 million people worldwide are being trafficked into sex slavery and forced labour markets, generating over $150 billion in illegal revenue. An alliance between the Catholic Church and law enforcement officials known as the Santa Marta Group is looking to use the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end this this horrifying yet lucrative business that has affected a wide array of industries from farming to sports. UNIFEED-UNTV
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STORY: UN / HUMAN TRAFFICKING
TRT: 02:38
SOURCE: UNIFEED-UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DATELINE: 7 APRIL 2016, NEW YORK CITY/ RECENT
SHOTLIST
RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations Headquarters

07 APRIL 2016, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press conference
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Cardinal Vincent Nickols, Archbishop of Westminster, United Kingdom:
“This partnership in particular, which I say is a bit unusual, depends on the growth of trust, and that trust is the very heart of what Santa Marta is about; achieving partnerships based on trust that otherwise probably would not exist.”
4. Med shot, reporter at the conference
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Kevin Hyland, Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner, United Kingdom:
“If we look back at the transatlantic slave trade that spanned 200 years, during that whole time it is estimated there was between 10 and 12 million in slavery. So we’re talking about, today, that there could be potentially 21 million or more. So it shows what an issue this is not just for individual countries, but globally.”
6. Med shot, reporter asking a question
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Kevin Hyland, Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner, United Kingdom:
“Whenever we buy something, whether it be a mobile phone, whether it be our clothes, whether it be our cars, there are so many checks and balances on every element of that material in that product. But what checks and balances are there on human beings? And why is it everything is looked upon in profit? We see shock and horror when share prices drop, but at the same time there are 21 million people across the world who are suffering. We don’t see the same shock and horror around that.”
8. Close up, cameraperson adjusting his camera
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Cardinal Vincent Nickols, Archbishop of Westminster, United Kingdom:
“And I think so much is shocking, and not least the fact that there is probably in the UK(United Kingdom), no town that in which slave labour isn’t being used. And if that is true in the UK, it’s certainly true in the USA (United States of America). So this is hidden because it’s hidden in so many different ways and in so many nooks and crannies.”
10. Wide shot, reports taking notes
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Kevin Hyland, Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner, United Kingdom:
“At that event, to see those young men – there was about 500 of them from the academies – their response to it was obviously shock that it was happening in their sport, but one of actual ‘we’re not gonna allow this to happen’. So I think the fact that the Premier League is now partnering to actually raise awareness across it’s own profession is something that we should actually commend. And I think it’s actually using sports, and that’s what we hope to do in areas like Nigeria; bring sport to those regions.”
12. Zoom out, press conference ending
STORYLINE
More than 21 million people worldwide are being trafficked into sex slavery and forced labour markets generating over $150 billion in illegal venue. An alliance between the Catholic Church and law enforcement officials known as the Santa Marta Group is looking to use the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end this this horrifying yet lucrative business that has affected a wide array of industries from farming to sports.

The group gets its name from the Papal residence where the first meeting was formed in an effort to create partnerships in developing strategies to combat as well as prevent human trafficking from happening at the source.

Speaking at a press conference in New York, Cardinal Vincent Nickols, the ecclesiastical lead at the Santa Marta group, said the alliance is about “achieving partnerships based on trust that otherwise probably would not exist.” He said the church’s presence in the communities can help bring these cases to light but there must be a “clear undertaking that victims will be treated as victims and not as criminals.”

Cardinal Nickols said there is probably “no town” in the United Kindgom (UK) “in which slave labour isn’t being used. And if that is true in the UK, it’s certainly true in the USA (United States of America).”

The UK’s Anti-Slavery Commissioner Kevin Hyland said human trafficking is an issue “not just for individual countries, but globally”. He said “if we look back at the transatlantic slave trade that spanned 200 years, during that whole time it is estimated there was between 10 and 12 million in slavery” compared to more than 21 million today.

Hyland said the most effective way to combat human trafficking is through development that would “change the culture.” He said increasing job opportunities and equal rights for women, as well as raising awareness, could prevent people at the countries of source from falling victim to human trafficking. Hyland said resolving the human trafficking epidemic cannot be resolved by pursuit only, rather must be accompanied by sustained development.

Hyland said partnerships have to be created also with the private sector to combat human trafficking.

He commended steps taken by the Premier Football League academies to raise awareness among their students through annual competitions. The commissioner pointer to an event organized by the academies last year at the international anti-slavery museum in Liverpool, where students listened to a former Premier League professional player who was trafficked from his native Sierra Leone.

He said “their response to it was obviously shock that it was happening in their sport, but one of actual ‘we’re not gonna allow this to happen’.”

Target 8.7 of the Sustainable Development Goals calls to “take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms.”
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