UN / AFRICAN HISTORY

10-Jul-2015 00:01:57
The Kenyan ambassador to the United Nations said Friday perceptions of Africa are defined by a “western mind set” -- even in the United Nations. UNIFEED UNTV
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: UN / AFRICAN HISTORY
TRT: 1:57
SOURCE: UNIFEED UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE 10 JULY 2015 NEW YORK
SHOTLIST
RECENT, NEW YORK CITY
1. Exterior, UNHQ

10 JULY 2015 NEW YORK

2. Wide shot, conference room
3. Wide shot, panel
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Ambassador Macharia Kamau of Kenya:
“So that when you speak to people, on an average day, their entire perception of who you are, who you represent, where you’re coming from, where you’re going, what you can possibly achieve in life, is constrained by a mind set that is dominated by a western perception of our being.”
5. Wide shot, delegates
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Ambassador Macharia Kamau of Kenya:
“Everything about our history, everything about our reality, in our existence, is contained and framed by a western mind set about who we are, where we came from, and where we are going to.”
7. Med shot, delegates
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Ambassador Macharia Kamau of Kenya:
“What is doable and what is desirable is defined by a western mind set that is at once conflicted by its horrific history, of denying people, including the African peoples, the realization of their own histories, and their own abilities; and at the same time trying to achieve even greater prosperity on the back of that history.
9. Med shot, delegates
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Ambassador Adonia Aybare of the African Union.
“Until the lions have their own historians, have their own historians, to tell the tales of the hunt, the hunt shall always glorify the hunters. Let’s sit down and write our own history so that we will be able to influence future generations. I thank you.”
11. Wide shot, delegates applauding
12. Wide shot, conference room.
STORYLINE
The Kenyan ambassador to the United Nations said today that perceptions of Africa are defined by a “western mind set” -- even in the United Nations.

Ambassador Macharia Kamau told a panel discussion about the learning and teaching of African history, “Everything about our history, everything about our reality, in our existence, is contained and framed by a western mind set about who we are, where we came from, and where we are going to.”

The panel , organized by the UN public information office and the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) examined the progress of the UNESCO- supported “The General History of Africa,” project which is designed to “ remedy the general ignorance on Africa’s history.”

Kamau said “those of us who work here” are reminded that even in the sphere of UN efforts at progress, “What is doable and what is desirable is defined by a western mind set that is at once conflicted by its horrific history, of denying people, including the African peoples, the realization of their own histories, and their own abilities; and at the same time trying to achieve even greater prosperity on the back of that history.”

Ambassador Adonia Aybare of the African Union, said, “Until the lions have their own historians… to tell the tales of the hunt, the hunt shall always glorify the hunters. Let’s sit down and write our own history so that we will be able to influence future generations. ”

UNESCO said the panel was, “organized to raise awareness of the importance of teaching the history of Africa at all levels within the educational system to combat racial prejudices and stereotypes against people of African descent and highlight the importance of Africa in the history of humanity.”

The UN’s public information office said, “Today’s event is part of a year-long educational effort of the United Nations Department of Public Information’s Remember Slavery Programme to help ensure that future generations understand the causes, consequences, and lessons of the slave trade. The vital message we draw here today is that the history of the transatlantic slave trade should not be taught in isolation from the broader history of Africa.”

UNESCO said “The first phase of this project began in 1964, when newly independent African States wished to "decolonize" the history of the continent, affirm Pan-African solidarity and achieve political and economic integration. Consequently, UNESCO launched the elaboration of General Histories of Africa, eight volumes of which have been published to date.”

The panel was called to introduce Volume IX of the collection, which is under preparation and covers the social, political, historical, cultural and economic developments in Africa since 1990, as well as the history of the African Diaspora.
The Remember Slavery Programme was established by the General Assembly in 2007 to honour the memory of the victims of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade and to raise awareness of the dangers of racism and prejudice today with educational materials and activities. .
Category