IRAQ / SYRIAN REFUGEES

18-Mar-2015 00:01:51
Four years after the start of the Syrian conflict, the official border crossing in Peshkhabour still receives refugees every day. Entire families are fleeing their villages and attempting dangerous journeys across frontlines and checkpoints, hoping for a better life in Kurdistan. UNHCR
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STORY: IRAQ / SYRIAN REFUGEE
TRT: 01:51
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: KURDISH / NATS

DATELINE: 4 MARCH 2015, KURDISTAN, IRAQ
SHOTLIST
1. Pan right, boats crossing Tigris River
2. Close up, bow of boat hitting dock
3. Med shot, Syrian Refugees disembarking boat
4. Wide shot, Peshkhabour Border crossing welcome center
5. Med shot, Syrian Refugees disembarking boat
6. Med shot, boat arriving to the docks
7. SOUNDBITE (Kurdish) Nishan, refugee:
“It was hard for me to take care of all these children during the journey, but of course they are my nieces and nephews so I had to.”
8. Wide shot, old woman returning to Syria loading her belonging onto a boat
9. Wide shot, woman taking a picture on a boat of a woman holding baby
10. Wide shot, Muhammed saying goodbye to his sister on the boat
11. Med shot, Muhammed on dock wiping his tear as the boat departs
12. SOUNDBITE (Kurdish) Muhammed, refugee:
“Every time I say goodbye to her I’m always expecting she will not be back.”
13. Med shot, refugees loading their belongings onto a bus
14. Various shots, buses departing to Gawilan camp
15. Pan left, Nishan being greeted by his cousin
16. SOUNDBITE (Kurdish) Nishan, refugee:
“The future of my family is going to be better if we stay in Kurdistan, unless things get better in Syria.”
17. Wide shot, more boats crossing the river with Kurdish flag in foreground
18. Wide shot, refugees in line at the customs area
19. Med shot, little girl holding her father’s hand
STORYLINE
Four years after the conflict in Syria started, the flow of refugees continues into northern Iraq.

100 people a day cross the Tigris River here. Their destination is this official border crossing in Peshkhabour.

The pain they have had to endure is etched on their faces. Some have travelled for weeks to get here.

Nishan has accompanied his brother’s family across the Syrian front lines to the safety of Kurdistan, Iraq.

He says that “it was hard for me to take care of all these children during the journey. But, of course, they are my nieces and nephews so I had to.”

But this border crossing works both ways. There are also people who are choosing to return to Syria.

Muhammad left Syria two years ago for northern Iraq. His sister makes the journey to visit him when she has a break from her studies at a university.

She is returning to Aleppo to finish her degree in English literature.

Muhammed said “every time I say goodbye to her I’m always expecting she will not be back.”

The new refugees pile their belongings and themselves onto the buses that will take them to Gawilan Camp. There they will be registered and given some assistance.

For Nishan, a long awaited reunion with a cousin has finally materialized. He said “the future of my family is going to be better if we stay in Kurdistan, unless things get better in Syria.”

Almost 245,000 Syrian refugees are in Iraq and everyday more arrive; they are all just looking for a better and safer life.
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