UNDP / HUMAN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

24-Jul-2014 00:03:08
UNDP’s 2014 Human Development Report on vulnerability and resilience warns that 2.2 billion people are poor or near-poor and calls for universal provision of basic social services, and stronger policies for social protection and full employment to advance and secure development progress.  UNDP

 
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STORY: UNDP / HUMAN DEVELOPMENT REPORT LAUNCH
TRT: 3.08
SOURCE: UNDP
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 24 JULY 2014, TOKYO, JAPAN
SHOTLIST
1. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arriving on stage to launch the 2014 Human Development Report
2. Various of audience and speakers
3. SOUNDIBTE(English) Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator:
“This human development report estimates that almost 1.5 billion people across 91 developing countries are currently multi-dimensionally poor, with overlapping deprivations in education, health and living standards. A further 800 million are identified as at risk of falling back into poverty. And this reminds us that it is never enough just to lift people out of poverty, as important as that is. The critical thing is to ensure that the escape from poverty is permanent.”
4.Pan right, audience
5. SOUNDIBTE English) Khalid Malik, Director of Human Developemnt Report Office and lead author of the report:
“The 2014 shows that human development progress is slowing down. And is increasingly precarious for many. Globalization for instance, which has brought benefits to many, has also created new risks. Financial and food crises have swept through nations and this year has seen the highest ever number of people displaced by violence, some 45 million people. This shows in an increasingly connected world, we face new vulnerability. Traditionally, most analysis of vulnerability is in relation to specific risks. Disasters, conflicts. In this report we take a wider approach, to understand the underlying drivers of vulnerability, and how individuals and society can become more resilient, and recover better and quicker from setbacks.
6. Cutaway, audience
7. Soundbite (English) Khalid Malik, Director of Human Developemnt Report Office and lead author of the report:
“Many of the millennium development goals are likely to be met by 2015, but future success is not automatic, and the gains are not necessarily permanent. Helping vulnerable groups and reducing inequality are essential to sustaining development both now and across generations.”
8. Med shot, photo op
9. Various of Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe
STORYLINE
2.2 billion people are poor or near-poor, warns UNDP’s 2014 Human Development Report on vulnerability and resilience Calls for universal provision of basic social services, and stronger policies for social protection and full employment to advance and secure development progress.

Persistent vulnerability threatens human development, and unless it is systematically tackled by policies and social norms, progress will be neither equitable nor sustainable. This is the core premise of the 2014 Human Development Report, released here today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Entitled Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience, the Report provides a fresh perspective on vulnerability and proposes ways to strengthen resilience.

According to income-based measures of poverty, 1.2 billion people live with $1.25 or less a day. However, the latest estimates of the UNDP Multidimensional Poverty Index reveal that almost 1.5 billion people in 91 developing countries are living in poverty with overlapping deprivations in health, education and living standards. And although poverty is declining overall, almost 800 million people are at risk of falling back into poverty if setbacks occur.

“By addressing vulnerabilities, all people may share in development progress, and human development will become increasingly equitable and sustainable,” stated UNDP Administrator Helen Clark today.

Latest Human Development Index shows overall slowdown in growth The Human Development Index also launched today shows that levels in human development continue to rise – yet the pace has slowed for all regions and progress has been highly uneven, according to the latest Human Development Index (HDI) included in the 2014 Human Development Report “Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience”, published today by United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

The lower human development groups appear to be improving at a higher rate – grounds for optimism that the gap between higher and lower human development groups is narrowing.

Zimbabwe, for example, experienced the biggest improvement in HDI due to a significant increase in life expectancy – 1.8 years from 2012 to 2013, almost quadruple the average global increase.

Meanwhile, the rankings remain unchanged at both ends of the HDI. Norway, Australia, Switzerland, Netherlands and United States remain in the lead for another year, while Sierra Leone, Chad, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Niger continue to rank bottom of the list.

Despite overall gains in human development, progress in all regions decelerated over 2008–2013 compared to 2000–2008. In the Arab States, Asia and the Pacific region, and Latin America and the Caribbean, average annual growth rate in HDI dropped by about half when comparing these periods.

The steepest declines in HDI values this year occurred in Central African Republic, Libya and Syria, where ongoing conflict contributed to a drop in incomes.

This year’s Report presents HDI values for 187 countries, and is the first index to use the latest International Comparison Program’s conversion rates of national currencies to purchasing power parity, released by the World Bank in May 2014.
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