UN / GLOBAL EDUCATION CRISIS

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31-Jan-2014 00:01:59
A United Nations (UN) report released this week says that some 130 million school children around the world are unable to read a single sentence, even after four years of attending school. UNESCO /FILE

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STORY: UN / GLOBAL EDUCATION CRISIS
TRT: 2.12
SOUCE: UNESCO /UNICEF /UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /URDU /NATS

DATELINE: 29 JANUARY 2014, ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA /FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE - UNICEF - 14 NOVEMBER 2013, MOGADISHU, SOMALIA

1. Various shots, classroom

UNESCO - 29 JANUARY 2014, ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA

2. Wide shot, meeting room
3. Med shot, dais
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Getachew Engida, Deputy-Director-General, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO):
“Every country must invest far more in its greatest renewable energy and that is its human ingenuity. And this must start on the benches of schools.”

FILE - UNMISS - 13 JANUARY 2014, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

5. Various shots, young people taking exam in classroom

UNESCO - 29 JANUARY 2014, ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Pauline Rose, Director, Global Monitoring Report (GMR): “By 2015, many countries will still not have reached the “education for all” goals. This impact is also creating a global learning crisis that is hitting the disadvantaged the hardest. This really is showing us that we need to step up to the mark in investing in good quality teachers.”

FILE - UNICEF - 25 OCTOBER 2013, KABUL, AFGHANISTAN

7. Various shots, class for girls

UNESCO - 29 JANUARY 2014, ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA

8. SOUNDBITE (Urdu/English) Mariam Khalique, Teacher, Swat , Pakistan (and Malala’s teacher:
“This means, a teacher is like an architect who builds the soul and the character of a child.”

FILE - UNICEF - 25 OCTOBER 2013, KABUL, AFGHANISTAN

9. Wide shot, girls entering the school building
10. Various shots, girl’s class

STORYLINE:

A United Nations (UN) report released this week says that some 130 million school children around the world are unable to read a single sentence, even after four years of attending school.

The waste to governments – $129 billion a year – and at the root of the crisis are ill-qualified teachers and poor access to schools.

The report authored by the independent Education for All (EFA) Global Monitoring Report, commissioned by the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) calls on governments to draft the best teachers to teach the most underprivileged if the goal of universal education is ever to be reached.

SOUNDBITE (English) Getachew Engida, Deputy-Director-General, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO):

“Every country must invest far more in its greatest renewable energy and that is its human ingenuity. And this must start on the benches of schools.”

In 2011, the number of children out of school was 57 million, half of whom lived in conflict-affected countries.

In sub-Saharan Africa, only 23 per cent of poor girls in rural areas were completing primary education by the end of the decade.

And the disparity is not only restricted to the developing world. Even in high-income countries education systems are failing significant minorities and immigrants in rich countries are also left behind.

The report says the world will already miss the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of full primary schooling for children for both boys and girls everywhere.

SOUNDBITE (English) Pauline Rose, Director, Global Monitoring Report (GMR):

“By 2015, many countries will still not have reached the “education for all” goals. This impact is also creating a global learning crisis that is hitting the disadvantaged the hardest. This really is showing us that we need to step up to the mark in investing in good quality teachers.”

The report proposes strategies for teachers like training to support the weakest learners, overcoming inequalities by allocating the best teachers to the most challenging areas of a country and government incentives.

SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Mariam Khalique, Teacher, Swat , Pakistan (and Malala’s teacher):

“This means, a teacher is like an architect who builds the soul and the character of a child.”

The building for girls could be a greater challenge. Almost two thirds of illiterate adults are women. The poorest young women in developing countries may not achieve universal literacy until 2072.
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UNESCO /FILE
Asset ID
U140131d