LEBANON / SYRIA REFUGEES EDUCATION

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18-Jan-2014 00:03:14
Nearly 2.3 million children have stopped attending school in the Syrian Arab Republic. Also, more than 60 per cent of the 735,000 school-aged refugee children in the region are not enrolled in school. UNICEF

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STORY: LEBANON / SYRIA REFUGEES EDUCATION
TRT: 3.14
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 10 JANUARY 2014, BEIRUT, LEBANON

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, refugee camp
2. Wide shot, class outdoors
3. Close up, children in class
4. SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Hanaa, Syrian Refugee:
“Back in Syria I did not stop going to school. Even during summer holidays we would cry and want the holidays to end.”
5. Med shot, a class under tarp
6. Close up, student stands up
7. SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Rafah, Syrian Refugee:
“We saw them shooting children so we came. They told us: There will be school the day after tomorrow. They fooled us, and we came.”
8. Various shots, teacher playing with kids
9. SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Nariman Borhani, Teacher:
“Their situation is very difficult. They don’t have much to occupy their time with. And at home all they get is violence. I’ve witnessed many violent situations wich I can’t always control. A 7 year-old child injures his friends with a bottle. Or they even use a torn Pepsi can to hurt each other. The violence is really difficult and we are trying to teach them even how to clean up.”
10. Wide shot, teacher with a group of kids
11. Med shot, teacher playing with kids
12. SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Zaher Nebhan, Teacher:
“We don’t accept hitting. And we talk about cleanliness and good behavior. We do all these for the boys we work with. So, recently we have seen huge difference.”
13. Pan right, school area to ruins
14. SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Nariman Borhani, Teacher:
“It’s a personal goal for me to make these children feel like they are in the school.”
15. Wide shot, class in shelter
16. Med shot, kids shadows on the tarp
17. Closeup, kids drawing
18. Wide shot, class
19. SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Hanaa, Syrian Refugee:
“Either a teacher or a doctor. A teacher to teach the children so that they can become doctors or engineers or lawyers. Look at my teacher Rula. She teaches us and she is wonderful.”
20. Med shot, children playing
21. Wide shot, children playing

STORYLINE:

Nearly 2.3 million children have stopped attending school in the Syrian Arab Republic. Also, more than 60 per cent of the 735,000 school-aged refugee children in the region are not enrolled in school.

In Lebanon alone, fewer than 25 per cent of Syrian children are enrolled in public education.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Hanaa, Syrian Refugee:
“Back in Syria I did not stop going to school. Even during summer holidays we would cry and want the holidays to end.”

Most Syrian refugee children have been out of school for one to two years.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Rafah, Syrian Refugee with impaired vision:
“We saw them shooting children so we came. They told us: There will be school the day after tomorrow. They fooled us, and we came.”

Being out of school means that the risk of exploitation and abuse of children increases, while the prospects for a better future diminish. The lingering conflict in their home country is jeopardizing a whole generation of children.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Nariman Borhani, Teacher:
“Their situation is very difficult. They don’t have much to occupy their time with. And at home all they get is violence. I’ve witnessed many violent situations wich I can’t always control. A 7 year-old child injures his friends with a bottle. Or they even use a torn Pepsi can to hurt each other. The violence is really difficult and we are trying to teach them even how to clean up.”

UNICEF and its partners, among them local NGOs Beyond and Sawa, have been scaling up non-formal education initiatives to accommodate children who have not been absorbed in the public school system.

One initiative has been to bring non-formal education to tented settlements like Hanaa’s and Rafah’s. Through the classes, the most vulnerable children are able to learn and play together, and receive psychosocial support in a safe environment.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Zaher Nebhan, Teacher:
“We don’t accept hitting. And we talk about cleanliness and good behavior. We do all these for the boys we work with. So, recently we have seen huge difference.”

Following the violence that children witness or experience, they tend to play out their severe distress by being aggressive with each other.

Through the non-formal education, which includes psycho-social support and recreational activities, vulnerable children learn how to cope with their experiences and behave with each other.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Nariman Borhani, Teacher:
“It’s a personal goal for me to make these children feel like they are in the school.”

While waiting for formal education to kick in, teachers like Borhani give these children hope for their future,and even more important, let them dream.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic), Hanaa, Syrian Refugee:
“Either a teacher or a doctor. A teacher to teach the children so that they can become doctors or engineers or lawyers. Look at my teacher Rula. She teaches us and she is wonderful.”

The barriers to these children’s education are many. The costs of transportation and tuition may be too great for families to bear. Some school in Lebanon teach some subjects in English and French, languages Syrian children may not speak.

Also, the Syrian parents may be reluctant to send their children to school out of concern for their safety.
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Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNICEF
Asset ID
U140118b