VIETNAM / NO WASTE FARMING

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16-Oct-2013 00:02:35
‘V-A-C’ farming is a no-waste system integrating fish farming, raising livestock and growing fruit and vegetables, all on the same farm. Waste products from one part of the system are recycled and used as a resource by other parts of the system. FAO

 

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Description
STORY: VIETNAM / FOOD SUSTAINABILITY
TRT: 2.35
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: VIETNAMESE / NATS


DATELINE: 22-27 JULY 2013, HA NAM PROVINCE, THANH HOA PROVINCE, HANOI, VIETNAM


SHOTLIST:

22-27 JULY 2013, HA NAM PROVINCE, VIETNAM

1. Wide shot, farmer grazing two cows on raised embankment between rice paddies
2. Med shopt, woman removing weeds from young rice paddy fields
3. Med shot, farmer grazing two water buffalo on irrigation embankment alongside pond

22-27 JULY 2013, HANOI, VIETNAM

4. Med shot, scooters going into Hanoi
5. Med shot, people eating traditional soup at noodle shops at lunch
6. Pan right, covered fruit and vegetable market
7. Med shot, woman pushes her bike through traffic, loaded with lilies for sale

22-27 JULY 2013, HA NAM PROVINCE, VIETNAM

8. Pan right, green fields of paddy rice
9. Wide shot of house with fish pond. A farmer (Dung) throws fish feed from dinghy.
10. SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Nguyen Ngoc Triu, President, VACVINA:
“V-A-C in Vietnamese is vuon/ao/chuong, which means garden/pond/livestock pen. Vietnamese families, especially in the delta areas, normally have a pond in front or in the back of their house. They also have gardens and pigpens.”

22-27 JULY 2013, THANH HOA PROVINCE, VIETNAM

11. Close-up, piglets putting snouts through gaps in their pig pen

12. SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Nguyen Ngoc Triu, President, VACVINA:
“Which means garden/pond/livestock pen.”

22-27 JULY 2013, HA NAM PROVINCE, VIETNAM

13. Med shot, woman carrying duck feed in basket from farm shed out toward pond
14. Med shot, Dung carries dinghy, places on water and steps in

22-27 JULY 2013, THANH HOA PROVINCE, VIETNAM

15. Pan left, V-A-C farm showing farmer, ducks, pond and garden fields

22-27 JULY 2013, HA NAM PROVINCE, VIETNAM

16. Med shot, Dung hoses down his pigs and cleans their enclosure
17. SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Nguyen Ngoc Triu, President, VACVINA:
“This is an integrated system.”

22-27 JULY 2013, HANOI, VIETNAM

18. Med shot, scooters at an intersection in Hanoi
19. Wide shot, Trucks travelling on a highway on Hanoi’s periphery, new building construction

22-27 JULY 2013, HA NAM PROVINCE, VIETNAM

20. Med shot, Farmer grazing cows on raised embankment around rice paddies

22-27 JULY 2013, THANH HOA PROVINCE, VIETNAM

21. Wide shot, woman selling fruit at market

22-27 JULY 2013, HA NAM PROVINCE, VIETNAM

22. Med shot, Dung tossing fish feed powder into water from dinghy

22-27 JULY 2013, THANH HOA PROVINCE, VIETNAM

23. Med shot, farmer wading up to waist in fish pond, extending net

22-27 JULY 2013, HA NAM PROVINCE, VIETNAM

24. Med shot, dozens of ducks along side of fish pond
25. Med shot, Dung clipping leaves, vines on garden vegetable

22-27 JULY 2013, THANH HOA PROVINCE, VIETNAM

26. Med shot, pigs wallowing in water in pen

22-27 JULY 2013, HA NAM PROVINCE, VIETNAM

27. Med shot, woman fills bucket with waste water from underground receptacle
28. Wide shot, woman puts duck feed into feeding trough, ducks swimming forward
29. Close up, duckling at water’s edge, fish and the pond be visible under water
30. Close up, woman irrigates garden plants with waste water
31. Close up, hands on bucket as woman waters garden
32. Tilt up, from pigs in the livestock shed to metal piping running up one wooden beam and running across the inside of the roof of the pig area
33. Med shot, woman squats, lights gas cooker in kitchen and puts pot of food on to cook
34. SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Dung Nguyen Ngoc, Farmer:
“For example, with a pigpen, we don’t have to buy gas for cooking. The manure is used for fish production. The biogas system helps protect the environment. We also use manure for the garden. The waste water of biogas is very good for irrigating crops. This type of irrigation water is better than nitrate.”
35. Med shot, woman walks toward camera from house between two fields in garden, has bucket
36. Wide shot, Dung taking fish from bucket, places them in bag
37. Med shot, Dung stands at side of pen, looking in at brood of pigs
38. Med shot, Dung clipping vines and leaves in garden
39. Med shot, food served at beginning of a meal at Dung’s house
40. Wide shot, Family gathered around the table at beginning of lunch
41. Various shot, different family members and friends eating


STORYLINE:

In 1990, one in three Vietnamese people didn’t have enough to eat. Today, that number is down by more than 80 percent. People are eating more, and have a diverse range of foods for better nutrition. How did Viet Nam find a food system that works? Some of the credit goes to V-A-C (vee-ay-see) farming, promoted by a government NGO called VACVINA. (vackveena).

SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Nguyen Ngoc Triu, President, VACVINA:
“V-A-C in Vietnamese is vuon/ao/chuong, which means garden/pond/livestock pen. Vietnamese families, especially in the delta areas, normally have a pond in front or in the back of their house. They also have gardens and pigpens. This is an integrated system.”

By the 1990s, after decades of central planning, many families began leasing land from the government. They could decide what to grow and sell the surplus at market. Family farms became family businesses.

V-A-C links fish farming, raising livestock and growing fruit and vegetables all year round. Waste products from one part of the system are recycled and used by other parts of the system. Even the nutrient-rich silt from the bottom of the pond is recycled to fertilize the garden and create new land for planting.

Usually pigs are the main livestock. They provide income, but they also power the gas cooker in the family’s kitchen.

SOUNDBITE (Vietnamese) Dung Nguyen Ngoc, Farmer:
“For example, with a pigpen, we don’t have to buy gas for cooking. The manure is used for fish production. The biogas system helps protect the environment. We also use manure for the garden. The waste water of biogas is very good for irrigating crops. This type of irrigation water is better than nitrate.”

Dung and his family make between 5 and 7 thousand dollars a year from all their farm activities. Everything they eat is produced here.

Long gone are the days when rice was scarce.
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Geographic Subjects
Creator
FAO  
Asset ID
U131016f