UN / SUDAN WRAP

Preview Language:   Original
24-Sep-2010 00:03:14
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and US President Barack Obama along with leaders from around the world participate in a high-level meeting to discuss Sudan’s two critical referenda on that country’s future.

Available Language: Original
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
Original
Other Formats
Description
STORY: UN / SUDAN WRAP
SOURCE: UNTV
TRT: 3.14
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/ NATS

DATELINE: 24 SEPTEMBER 2010, NEW YORK CITY/ FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior North Lawn UN building

24 SEPTEMBER 2010, NEW YORK CITY

2. Various shots, US President Obama and Secretary-General Ban shaking hands with dignitaries
3. Zoom out, dais
4. Med shot, US Secretary of State Clinton, Obama and Ambassador Rice
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ban Ki-moon, United Nations Secretary-General:
“North and South must coexist peacefully. Sudanese North and South must negotiate agreements that reflect the reality of a shared history and shared resources. Agreements on border management, citizenship, migration, security, debts and assets; these issues do not all need to be resolved ahead of the referenda, but it is crucial that a mutually beneficial framework for managing North-South relations is put in place quickly.”
6. Tracking shot, Obama walks to the podium
7. Zoom out, audience
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Barack Obama, United States President:
“Progress towards a negotiated and definitive end to the conflict is possible, and now is the moment for all nations to send a strong signal that there will be no time and no tolerance for spoilers who refuse to engage in peace talks. Indeed there can be no lasting peace in Darfur and no normalization of relations between Sudan the United States without accountability for crimes that have been committed. Accountability is essential not only for Sudan’s future, it also sends a powerful message about the responsibilities of all nations; that certain behaviour is simply not acceptable in this world.”
9. Med shot, delegates
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Ali Osman Taha, Vice President of Sudan:
“The international community is sending conflicting signals, with support for peace on one hand and extreme rhetoric of demonization on the other, the cardinal example of which is the unjustified position of the ICC. The currently adopted policies by some sectors of the international community to weaken our country through stifling economic sanctions and isolation are serious impediments to a peaceful and prosperous Sudan.”
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Salva Kiir Mayardit, Second Vice President of Sudan:
“It is in our interest to see to it that the Northern Sudan remains a viable State, just as it should be in the interest of the North to see Southern Sudan emerge also as a viable State. Northern Sudan is our neighbour and we share a common history. Moreover, I have reiterated several times that even if Southern Sudan separates from the North, it will not shift to the Indian Ocean or move to the Atlantic Coast.”
12. Tracking shot, Obama leaving the room

STORYLINE:

A high level meeting with leaders from around the world was held today (24 September) at UN Headquarters to discuss Sudan’s two critical referenda on that country’s future.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told the assembled leaders that regardless of the outcome of the referenda, “North and South must coexist peacefully” and negotiate agreements “that reflect the reality of a shared history and shared resources”.

He said that a variety issues including border management, citizenship, migration and security as well as debts and assets “do not all need to be resolved ahead of the referenda, but it is crucial that a mutually beneficial framework for managing North-South relations is put in place quickly.”

The Secretary- General and other world leaders renewed their support for the parties to the 2005 peace accord that ended Sudan’s North-South civil war as they embark on the critical final phase of the agreement – the upcoming referenda on the self-determination of Southern Sudan and the central region of Abyei.

United States President Barack Obama noted that “progress towards a negotiated and definitive end to the conflict is possible” and called on all nations to “send a strong signal that there will be no time and no tolerance for spoilers who refuse to engage in peace talks”.

He also stressed that “there can be no lasting peace in Darfur and no normalization of relations between Sudan the United States without accountability for crimes that have been committed”.

Last month, the International Criminal Court (ICC) issued a second arrest warrant for Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir, adding genocide to the list of charges for crimes he allegedly committed in the war-ravaged Darfur region of western Sudan. In March 2009 the Sudanese leader became the first sitting head of State to be indicted by the Court, which charged him with two counts of war crimes and five counts of crimes against humanity.

Sudanese Vice President Ali Osman Taha expressed concern about “the unjustified position of the ICC” and said that the international community “is sending conflicting signals”, support peace on one hand while issuing “extreme rhetoric of demonization on the other”.

He added that “stifling economic sanctions and isolation” are weakening the country and “are serious impediments to a peaceful and prosperous Sudan.”

Second Vice President of Sudan and President of the semi autonomous South Sudan, Salva Kiir, said that it is in the mutual interest of both North and South Sudan to see to it that the both remain a viable States.

He added that “even if Southern Sudan separates from the North, it will not shift to the Indian Ocean or move to the Atlantic Coast.”

Inhabitants of the south will vote on 9 January next year on whether to secede from Sudan or remain united with the rest of the country, as stipulated under the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), which formally ended two decades of fighting between the northern-based Government and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement/Army (SPLM/A) in the south.

At the same time, residents of the central area of Abyei will vote separately on whether to retain the region’s special administrative status in the north or become part of Bahr el-Ghazal state in the south.
Series
Category
Geographic Subjects
Asset ID
U100924d