ASIA / ENERGY

11-Oct-2008
By 2030, the Asia Pacific region will account for half the world's energy demand. To meet it, countries in this region will need to ensure that supplies are available, affordable, and sustainable. Cleaner and more efficient technologies will be needed to stave off dire environmental consequences – while maintaining economic growth. UNTV

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STORY: ASIA PACIFIC / POWER
TRT: 4.03
SOURCE: UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: THAI / NATS

DATELINE: FILE / APRIL 2008

SHOTLIST

FILE / DATE UNKNOW / CHINA

1. Various shots, garment factory
2. Various shots, auto plant

FILE / APRIL 2008, THAILAND

3. Wide shot, oil rig / smoke stack / transmission lines
4. Wide shot, city scene
5. Wide shot, Somboon Saenthongcharoen getting out of his truck
6. Various shots, orange market
7. SOUNDBITE (Thai) Somboon Saenthongcharoen, entrepreneur:
"I am worried because it seems like the prices are rising non-stop. I could handle it if the prices went up once a year or even twice a year, but they keep going up so I am getting really worried."
8. Wide shot, heavy traffic
9. Various shots, orange market
10. Various shots, people walking in market
11. Various shots, hydro dam
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Noeleen Heyzer, United Nations Executive Secretary of the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific:
"if we are to have energy security then we need to move away from just a national perspective."
13. Wide shot, heyzer talks at the podium
14. Wide shot, ESCAP on session
15. Various shots, delegates in assembly

FILE / 2003, CHINA


16. Various shots, power plant
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Rae Kwon Chung, South Korean Climate specialist:
"So far many governments and also the private sector are obsessed over increasing the supply and not many are exploring the potential where we can economize and improve efficiency for the consumption of energy."
18. Various shots, electric trains in china

FILE / APRIL 2008, THAILAND

19. Various shots, UNESCAP during session
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Wei Han, Green Fortune Investment:
"I see a lot of promise in this. We have an investment company called Green Fortune Investment. We invest in renewable energy and water businesses in China."

FILE / 2003, CHINA

21. Various shots, Chinese city
22. Various shots, rural workers
23. Wide shot, man chopping wood
24. Med shot, woman lights firewood stove

FILE / APRIL 2008, THAILAND

25. Various shots, windmill
26. Med shot, woman switches on light
27. Wide shot, man with cow
28. SOUNDBITE (English) Noeleen Heyzer, United Nations Executive Secretary of the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific: (Images under audio)
"At the end of the day it is about efficiency, it is about wastage, but it is also about new and clean technology. It is also about the need to develop a distributive system that reaches some of the poorest areas in the best possible way so that we don't leave anyone out."
29. Wide shot, Mahatma Gandhi's bust inauguration ceremony

STORYLINE:

Fast-paced. Efficient. And growing. This is the image of many Asian societies today.

But as demand and cost of energy rise, many wonder if economic growth in the region can be sustained and if so, at what price for the environment?

Somboon Saenthongcharoen owns a small business in Thailand, transporting oranges to the wholesale market just outside the capital, Bangkok. But with fuel prices rising he's finding it increasingly difficult to run his business.

SOUNDBITE (Thai) Somboon Saenthongcharoen, entrepreneur:
"I am worried because it seems like the prices are rising non-stop. I could handle it if the prices went up once a year or even twice a year, but they keep going up so I am getting really worried."

Burdened by higher fuel costs – and trapped by snarling traffic and emissions. His situation mirrors that of many countries.

And with Asia- Pacific poised to become the world's largest consumer of energy in the next 20 years, energy security has become a topic of concern in the entire region.

SOUNDBITE (English) Noeleen Heyzer, United Nations Executive Secretary of the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific:
"if we are to have energy security then we need to move away from just a national perspective."

Noeleen Heyzer leads the UN's Economic and Social Commission for Asia-Pacific, known as ESCAP.

The commission has been focusing on how to bring governments and the private sector together, with the triple aim of making energy available… affordable and sustainable.

Some skeptics wonder if a common approach can be reached. The Asia-Pacific region includes giants like China and India, but also many smaller countries, and importers as well as exporters of energy.

Most will agree that energy waste can, and should be, reduced, says South Korea's point man on climate change Rae Kwon Chung.

SOUNDBITE (English) Rae Kwon Chung, South Korean climate specialist:
"So far many governments and also the private sector are obsessed over increasing the supply and not many are exploring the potential where we can economize and improve efficiency for the consumption of energy."

Studies show that measures to improve energy use, like public transport– could bring efficiency gains of 20 to 30% to the region over the next two decades.

And many believe that the key lies in attracting entrepreneurs to invest in energy-efficient technology.

SOUNDBITE (English) Wei Han, 'Green Fortune Investment':
"I see a lot of promise in this. We have an investment company called Green Fortune Investment. We invest in renewable energy and water businesses in China."

But while the fast-growing economies of the region grab most of the headlines, Asia-Pacific is also home to one billion people who have no access to electricity.

There are also 1.5 billion people in the region who still use traditional biomass -- like burning wood – for basic necessities like cooking and heating their homes.

Developing sound policies for the future means making sure that they too have access to energy, that won't ruin their environment.

SOUNDBITE (English) Noeleen Heyzer, United Nations Executive Secretary of the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific: (Images under audio)
"At the end of the day it is about efficiency, it is about wastage, but it is also about new and clean technology. It is also about the need to develop a distributive system that reaches some of the poorest areas in the best possible way so that we don't leave anyone out."

It's a message that Mahatma Gandhi –honored with this bust at the UN's offices in Bangkok – would approve.
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UNTV
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U081011b